Square

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Square

A unit of area equivalent to 100 square feet. It has historically been used to measure real estate in Australia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But by wearing his squarest clothes he looked one of those TV evangelists you stumble across if you mis-key while trying to flick from Goals On Sunday to the cricket.
The comedic actor had not proven himself as a dramatic actor to most Bat-fans--and even those that had seen his dramatic turn in Clean and Sober (1988) could still deride his physical stature: "Kane had drawn a Batman who was 'a big hunk, 6'2", square-jawed, a young Cary Grant.' The director picked Michael Keaton, 5 feet 10 inches tall with a receding hairline and 'not the squarest jaw in town,' to play Batman." (45) These reverent comparisons to the "original" imply that fans expect continuity between the various media in which Batman is represented; but given the character's history up to this point, could they honestly expect anything less than yet another re-invention?
Mitt Romney is the squarest man to run for the presidency since, well, George Romney.
(One of my favorites, with a boldly printed signature that reads RICHARD R, has the squarest jaw I've ever seen on a woman.) Four of the profiles face in a different direction from the majority; a number tinker with the standard elements, offering a green cloak, for instance, or shifting the seating to three-quarters profile.
Having looked imperious in his last game against a poor Poland, Ledley King was made to look the squarest of pegs by the outstanding Riquelme.
I also see that there is nothing like outdoor heaters and cafe umbrellas to make the squarest places look cool and inviting.
because we cut our squarest corners with a .3mm radius bit.
PETER CUSHING (64-81) was the squarest of all the British actors, in the nicest possible way of course.
But the Los Angeles rioters of 1992 were mostly Central American immigrants, and the television or radio broadcasts that appealed to them must surely have expressed the squarest of old-fashioned family values, in the Hispanic style, just as Dan Quayle would advocate; yet people rioted even so.