scale

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Scale

Payment of different rates of interest on CDs of varying maturities. A bank is said to "post a scale." Commercial paper dealers also post scales.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Scale

The range of prices at which an underwriter offers to place with investors a serial bond, where the individual bonds have different maturities.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

scale

The schedule of yields (or prices) at which a serial bond issue is offered to the public by the underwriter. The schedule reflects yields at the various maturities being offered. Also called offering scale. See also inverted scale, preliminary scale.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

scale

The relationship between measurements on a plan or map and the dimensions of the physical object represented.One inch might represent 10 feet or 10 miles.Topographic maps contain two scales,one for distance and one for change in elevation.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Superficial lesions of the mastoid and squama were drilled until normal mastoid air cells were reached.
Developmental studies on the interparietal part of the human occipital squama. J Anat.1993;182:197-204.
The imagines are characterized by the following character combination: Antenna with 13 clavola; wing vein R2+3 present, without setae in wing veins, squama with11-13 long setae; mid and hind tibia with two tibial spurs; mid and hind legs with 2 pseudospurs on ta1, ta2 and ta3; length of ta4 shorter than ta5 in all legs; inferior volsella trapeziform, with numerous microtrichiae and 18-25 apical weak setae.
A 1979 review of more than 50 extracanalicular osteomas showed that the mastoid was the most commonly reported temporal bone site, followed by the squama. (1)
Lan and Jiang, Manis Squama, Glehniae Radix, Corni Fructus, 2002 [35] Astragalus, Fritillariae Cirrhosae Bulbus, Ophiopogonis Radix, Polygoni Multiflori Radix, Rehmanniae Radix Preparata, Dioscoreae Rhizoma, Alismatis Rhizoma, and Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizome.
The tumor also involved the squama of the temporal bone, the zygomatic process, and the greater wing of the sphenoid bone.