Split-Up


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

Split-Up

An action in which a publicly-traded company splits into two different publicly-traded companies. Stock in the company is exchanged for stock in both of the new companies according to some predetermined formula. A split-up may happen at government instigation, for example, to end a monopoly. A company may also voluntarily split up if it believes it will improve profitability.
References in periodicals archive ?
A split-up permits the disproportionate distribution of F and P stock to the R shareholders in exchange for their R stock.
These rulings address reorganizations that appear to involve spin-offs of existing subsidiaries as well as split-ups. Rather than requiring the reorganizing entities strictly to apply Sec.
355(e) on the interpretation of "plan (or series of related transactions)" for affected spinoffs, splitoffs and split-ups. The final regulations adopt, with modifications, Prop.
The most high-profile split-ups involved Foreign Secretary Robin Cook who ditched wife Margaret after 28 years when he had an affair with secretary Gaynor Regan, whom he later married.
The percentage split-ups of the segments categorized under the market have been used to arrive at the market sizes of each of the individual segments.
When it comes to self-assessment, Rob remains obsessed with list-making, to the point of compiling an all-time Top Five Most Memorable Split-Ups. This cues a series of flashbacks as Rob recalls, among others, a dazzling college co-ed (Catherine Zeta-Jones) who unceremoniously dumped him for someone more exciting, and a broken-hearted manic-depressive (Lili Taylor) who did the same.
368(a)(1)(D), involve transfers to controlled corporations that may be either divisive (spin-offs, split-offs or split-ups) or nondivisive.
The Secretary shall prescribe such regulations as may be appropriate to carry out the purposes of this section, including regulations to prevent the avoidance of the purposes of this section through split-ups, shell corporations, partnerships, or otherwise.
368(a)(1)(D) split-ups or split-offs (as opposed to spin-offs), it may be possible to step up the basis of a controlled corporation's assets with only one level of tax.