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Spike

Order ticket that shows the stock, price, number of shares, type, and account of the order. Origin: Practice of placing the ticket on a metal spike upon execution or cancellation. Spike is also a sudden, drastic increase in a company's share price.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

spike

A sudden, short-term change in the price of a security that just as suddenly returns close to its previous level. For example, a stock that has consistently traded in a $10 to $12 per share range may suddenly move to a price of $14 and then return to $12. The sudden rise to the $14 price is a spike.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spiking is supported by Quest Ventures, CRC Capital, Mars Blockchain, J Capital, and Jove Capital.
This model is an extension over previous bidimensional models such as the Izhikevich model [9] and Adaptive Exponential Integrate-and-Fire (AdEx) model [10] which allows more flexibility by simply reducing the number of parameters in order to generate various spiking patterns.
After the reported log spiking, Konnie spoke with both workers and he said they want to keep doing their jobs.
Gotman, "Relationships between interictal spiking and Seizures--Human and Experimental evidence," Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, vol.
[5] Performing Arithmetic Operations with Spiking Neural P Systems M.A.
We use an extended stochastic Spiking Response Model (SRM0) (Gerstner W.
The Student Union newspaper Waterfront carried out an investi- gation after Emily's claims and found a number of people who felt they had been the victim of drink spiking but had not been tested for drugs when taken to hospital.
He said: "There has been a relatively small, but potentially dangerous, problem of drink spiking in Leamington.
One of the most notorious crimes committed by Duranty and the Times was the spiking of Stalin's mass-starvation genocide in the Ukraine during the early 1930s.
Given this premise, Foreman can justify spiking trees as a last measure of defense--an argument to which he devotes a whole chapter.
"There's no question that spiking trees is an act of vandalism, potentially, tremendously dangerous, and I don't think that's the way in which people really concerned about the environment express their concerns in a constructive way."