Erosion

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Related to soil erosion: soil conservation

Erosion

A negative impact on one or more of a firm's existing assets.

Erosion

1. The gradual loss of an asset's value. See also: Depreciation.

2. The wearing away of real estate caused by natural events. For example, a rising sea level may erode a beach front property. Erosion can reduce the property's value.

erosion

The slow wearing away by natural forces such as water and wind.

References in periodicals archive ?
The five first-tier environmental KPIs for sustainable agriculture developed by Field to Market were soil erosion, energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, water use, and land use.
A study of the effects of soil erosion hazard(FAO model) on the amount of soil erosion using GIS.
About 13 million hectares of land have been damaged by soil erosion leading to reduced crop yield and loss of fertility.
As a result, the soil erosion program has become a revenue source for the environmental health division.
The effect of the PAM(H)+PG treatment on reducing soil erosion in all the soils, except for the loamy sand, was comparable to that of PG alone (Fig.
Following chapter nine, which addresses agriculture, population, and soil erosion on islands, the book closes with a chapter devoted to population cycles and the life span of civilizations.
Mr James is receiving support to increase slurry storage capacity and improve the farm's network of cow tracks to prevent run-off and soil erosion.
We looked around for the best way to do it,'' said Jim Dodson, a retired Edwards Air Force Base official who is board president of the Antelope Valley Resource Conservation District, itself an outgrowth of Depression-era efforts against soil erosion.
Reduced soil erosion by 356 billion pounds each year as a result of not having to plow weeds under the soil during field planting preparation;
This approach results in poor families being forced to relocate their homes, increases soil erosion and the use of dangerous chemicals, .
The slope also forced the use of complex erosion control measures, which occasionally required maintenance to ensure they had the capacity to control silt and soil erosion that occurred before the site was stabilized.