COLA

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Cost-of-Living Adjustment

An increase to a wage, salary, or pension designed so that the real value remains the same. That is, a cost-of-living adjustment increases the underlying wage, salary, or pension so that it keeps pace with (but does not run ahead of) inflation. Federal pensions and Social Security include cost-of-living adjustments, though few other pensions do.

Cost-of-living adjustment (COLA).

A COLA results in a wage or benefit increase that is designed to help you keep pace with increased living costs that result from inflation.

COLAs are usually pegged to increases in the consumer price index (CPI). Federal government pensions, some state pensions, and Social Security are usually adjusted annually, but only a few private pensions provide COLAs.

COLA

(pronounced like the beverage) See cost-of-living adjustment.

References in periodicals archive ?
The research team noted that their findings suggest the individuals who drank two or more glasses of soft drinks a day had a 17 percent increased risk of premature deaths as compared to the people who consumed less than a glass in a month.
Inryou Souken director Kazuhiro Miyashita said it will not be easy to make a breakthrough unless soft drink companies take radical measures.
Table 2 displays the impact of both total and incremental state soft drink taxes (as defined in the Data section) on BMI, overweight, and obesity as estimated by Equation (2), which includes state-specific time trends.
The Lagos High Court ruled that high levels of benzoic acid and additives in Coca-Cola's soft drinks could pose a health risk to consumers when mixed with ascorbic acid, commonly known as vitamin C.
* Which consumer trends are influencing innovation opportunities in adult soft drinks?
"Consumption of soft drinks during orthodontic treatment puts teeth at risk of decay due to the acid attack on enamel," says Dr.
Britvic is the largest supplier of branded still soft drinks in GB and the number two supplier of branded carbonated soft drinks in GB.
Further, a paper in the American Journal of Public Health ranked the UAE as the fifth highest consumer of soft drink consumption in the world with 27.3 gallons.
Mansour Ali, a water and soft drink salesman in Al-Bawadi, said the company stopped delivering its products two weeks ago.
In a new series of reports from Mintel examining consumer behavior in China, the market research firm finds that while consumers in China are ready to switch to healthier alternatives of carbonated soft drinks, brands have yet to offer the product options to fulfill this demand.