Snowballing

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Snowballing

Used in the context of general equities. Process by which the exercise of stop orders in a declining or advancing market causes further downward or upward pressure on prices, thus triggering more stop orders and more price pressure, and so on.

Snowballing

A situation in which a price rises or falls, which triggers stop orders, resulting in increased pressure to buy or sell the security. The increased or decreased demand for the security drives the price up or down even further, and the cycle continues until a price correction occurs. Snowballing should not be confused with a snowball, which is a different concept altogether.
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Nationwide police often warn about the dangers of throwing snowballs but West Midlands Police have been more restrained - tweeting twice during January 2013 to warn people against throwing snowballs at vehicles.
The tribunal also had to submit snowballs to a series of other tests, such as ingredients, process of manufacture, unpackaged appearance including size, taste and texture, circumstances of consumption (including time, place and manner of consumption), packaging and marketing.
Decide it you should make your snowballs one at a time or all at once.
Matthew Barnes, prosecuting, said: "On December 3 last year a group of young people were having a snowball fight in the vicinity of the restaurant.
We are receiving a great number of weather-related calls and are asking people to consider if the situation regarding snowball throwing is really a matter for police before they ring.
The Snowballs were being smuggled about like contraband and that hint of danger made them even more irresistible.
You'll always get someone who will take a game too far and maybe put stones in a snowball, but are we going to make throwing snowballs a crime?
She said: "Although it is just kids having fun in the snow, for many residents and drivers it can be extremely intimidating to have snowballs pelted at you.
2 -- color) Steven Brotz, 8, heaves a snowball at Mountasia Family Fun Center during Christmas in July festivities.
But Andrea Fitches, whose 16-year-old son Anthony is one of those suspended, said: "My son was found with a snowball in his hand he hasn't hurt anyone or thrown it at a person or building.
Here, the artist has drawn variously sized circles in white pencil on white vellum so that the snowball circles of "lights" almost disappear like bubbles in champagne or a Ryman in a snowstorm.
Neither [camera] shows evidence for cosmic snowballs," he concludes.