Slump

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Slump

A temporary fall in performance, often describing consistently falling security prices for several weeks or months.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Slump

Informal for a downturn in an industry or economy. It specifically refers to a recession, which is defined as negative GDP growth for two consecutive quarters. However, there is no set definition for what constitutes a slump.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Slump.

In an investment slump, prices fall. The slump may affect an individual investment as the result of company-specific problems or it may affect an entire investment market. Often a slump is short-term, but it may also signal a long-term decline.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

slump

see BUSINESS CYCLE.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

slump

see DEPRESSION.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Eleven of the study lakes were affected by thaw slumping, while the remaining 11 lakes were unaffected.
Therefore when the lake experiences thaw slumping, Pelletier's model says the lake grows more in the downhill direction than it does uphill, generating the lakes' characteristic elongated-egg shape.
Before slumping into loss-making territory last year, the company was posting profits of just 1% to 3% of sales, well below the industry average of 3% to 6%.
If China actually experienced a recession with slumping investment, unemployment could increase sharply and threaten the country's political stability.
The scarce, indirect observations of submarine landslides now available suggest the slumping sediments can travel swiftly, says Steven N.
the flesh of your mind stretched by an idea ..." rambles the sound track; meanwhile, in their sheer, lumpen thingness, the vast, bloated, slumping pumpkins ungraciously refuse to serve as metaphors for sculptures, ideas, or anything else.