Slavery

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Related to slave market: slave trade

Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The slave market episode, with its comment on Wilberforce, is certainly one of the most striking, while covertly articulated, ways in which the poem's aesthetic threatens--without entirely opposing--abolition's ambitions with jokey urbanity.
This sort of knowledge is generational," notes Cobb, who feared an enormous fact that a city slave market operated at the geographical birthplace of American capitalism was slipping from sight.
In 2007, just blocks from the infamous slave market, the Richmond Slavery Reconciliation Statue was erected as part of a slave trail, to raise awareness about the slave trade in this region.
One feature of the antebellum slave market that would further minimize the breakup of the slave family was the process of hiring out.
As an adult, his wife and children are sold at the slave market.
3]me's slave market paintings, For sale: Slaves at Cairo combines cruelty and eroticism -- one of the slaves is naked, long dark hair cascading down between her breasts, others are revealingly clad.
Calomiris and Pritchett investigate the determinants of slave family discounts, using data from the New Orleans slave market.
After Henry Brown, born into slavery, witnesses his family sold in the slave market, he collaborates with abolitionists and mails himself in a wooden packing crate to Philadelphia, to become a free man.
18 for a eucharist at a cathedral built atop a former slave market in Zanzibar, with Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams praying for "forgiveness for the past, mercy for the present, and humility for the future.
But the taint of the slave market somehow hangs over this arrangement; the days when rich women could buy a little African boy appear not to be quite so over.
This defensiveness also helps to account for the slippage that occurs in the second sentence in the above passage: in the first clause, Montagu acknowledges that Lady Bristol would expect a description of the conditions within the slave market of Istanbul; in the second, she refuses to actually describe what she witnesses in the exchange but mitigates its "horror"; in the third clause, she both grammatically and figuratively runs-on to an entirely new topic, that of the general beneficent treatment of slaves by the Turks.