test

(redirected from skin tests)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to skin tests: allergy skin test

Test

The event of a price movement that approaches a support level or a resistance level established earlier by the market. A test is passed if prices do not go below the support or resistance level, and the test is failed if prices go on to new lows or highs.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

test

The attempt by a stock price or a stock market average to break through a support level or a resistance level. For example, a stock that has declined to $20 on several occasions without moving lower may be expected to test this support level once again. Failing to fall below $20 one more time would be considered a successful test of the support level and a bullish sign for the stock.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, a person who is a skin test reactor with a healthy immune system is probably more likely to develop clinically active tuberculosis from organisms already present in the body than from an exposure to a new case of clinically active tuberculosis.
Everyone should be skin tested at least once and know whether their test result is positive or negative.
The lack of allergists and standard skin test reagents for the diagnosis of penicillin allergy makes the confirmation of penicillin allergic status not always possible [13-17].
The patient had no notable medical history, was born in the United States, and had a previously nonreactive tuberculin skin test. Upon admission, a radiograph demonstrated cavitary lung disease, and sputum was smear-positive for acid-fast bacilli.
'This has destroyed my life' JULIE Nicholson is a prime example of why skin tests should be carried out before using hair dye - both in salons and in the home.
The first replacement for the tuberculin skin test in a century, Quantiferon-TB (Cellestis), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001.
Generally, health officials recommended substituting blood tests for tuberculin skin tests during the shortage, giving skin tests to "priority indications" such as people at high risk for TB infection and substituting the product Aplisol for Tubersol in skin testing.
To further investigate the potential for a generalized [H.sub.1]-mediated event, we performed skin tests with crude brevetoxins and pure PbTx-3.
Reactions of in vivo HDM specific skin tests (both early as well as late skin reactions) did not significantly change when measured two years after the baseline measurement (Table 3, P = 0.09 or P = 0.07, resp., Table 3).
In general, skin tests can be performed on most patients regardless of age.
In eight patients, skin tests were positive with PPL and in six with MDM.