Sine Wave

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Sine Wave

Any curve plotted along an axis where the y-value moves above and below zero at a rate of y = sin(x). The Composite Index of Lagging Indicators is thought to be roughly a sine wave because interest rates and inflation, which make up the index, move in relation to each other in a way resembling the sine.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a sine curve approximation, it is desirable to partition the first quadrant interval [0-[pi]/2] into small subintervals and then approximate each interval by polynomials of a certain degree, rather than employing a single polynomial approximation.
A sine curve centred halfway between the minimum and maximum temperatures (Watson and Beattie 1996; Roltsch et al.
Maintaining a "steady strain on the line" and reducing the trough (the low point on the logistics readiness sine curve) was paramount to realizing the continuous readiness goal.
The pump operates with a sinusoidal rotor in which two complete sine curves create four separate, symmetrical compartments in the pump housing.
The results in Table 1 are for DRFM staircases which ideally approximate a sine curve. Non-ideal approximations can be expected to produce larger spurs.
Plauborg (2002) found a simple model that explained 98% of the variation for average soil temperature at 10 cm in Denmark using only air temperature for the current day and the two previous days, combined with a sine curve for seasonal effects.
The dots situated on a given sine curve belong to the same Saros series.
Abstract: Traditionally fitting a sine curve with three sample points is taken as a combined optimal problem in which three variables are involved.
Utilizing distributed resources in indigenous capacity while meeting the demands of volatile economic sine curves of growth and development, require a perspective of sustainable energy utility with resilience and adaptive capacity at core and at large,' the survey said.
In addition, the background [b.sup.i] in (11) is generated by exponential, polynomial, sigmoid, or sine curves with a random amplitude.
This is the second principle: "The bottom line is, curved walls make buildings seem bigger: sine curves, spirals, platoids.