sick pay

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Related to sick leave: Maternity leave

sick pay

the payments made to an employee who is unable to work normally due to illness. In principle these payments could be made in place of a wage, from a national insurance fund, or by the employers themselves. The current system of ‘statutory sick pay' in the UK (in operation since 1986) combines elements of both. The employer makes payments to the sick employee at a level determined by social security regulations, which are financed out of the National Insurance contributions held by the employer. No payments can be made until the fourth day of absence (unless there has been a previous period of absence due to illness shortly before). After seven days of absence a doctor's certificate is necessary; prior to that the employee provides self-certification. After a prolonged period of sickness absence (currently 28 weeks) responsibility for payment transfers to the DEPARTMENT OF WORK AND PENSIONS.

Many UK employers choose to operate their own sick-pay scheme alongside statutory sick pay, and provide more favourable benefits than the state scheme. Although, traditionally, occupational sick-pay schemes have been applied to managerial and white-collar rather than to blue-collar workers, most UK employees are now covered, by such a scheme. Often they will provide for the employee to receive full pay for up to 28 weeks. Provision of favourable sick pay is often thought to encourage ABSENTEEISM but the evidence suggests that this a short-run phenomenon largely confined to the period immediately after the scheme is introduced.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this case, it was the Texas Public Policy Foundation that sued, and then Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton lent his support, calling the paid sick leave ordinance "unlawful."
Without prejudice to the cases in which the employer is entitled to dismiss the employee (mentioned below) without notice or gratuity agreed upon, the employer may not dismiss the employee or give him a notice thereof while the employee is on sick leave
Cyprus had the highest levels of paid sick leave in 2015 across the EU according to Eurostat figures.
While employers who don't currently offer paid sick leave might balk at the costs, a substantial body of research suggests paid sick days might effectively pay for themselves by reducing overall rates of absenteeism.
* Unused paid sick leave of 40 hours or less must be carried over to the following year.
In 2014 sick leaves were issued in 222,900 cases, while in 2016 this number rose to 276,400.
In 2015 the force had 0.7% of police officers, or one in every 142, on long-term sick leave.
The percentage of private employers that offer paid sick leave climbed to 58%, from 53%.
In particular, workers without paid sick leave were 1.6 times less likely to get a flu shot, 30 percent less likely to have their blood pressure checked, 23 percent less likely to have had a Pap smear and 40 percent less likely to have their cholesterol checked.
In a previous large-scale cross-sectional study of the Swedish working population, active jobs among women were positively associated with LS exceeding 2 months, which contradicted the positive "active learning hypothesis" in the DC model that presupposes a reduced risk of sick leave [13].
If too little paid sick leave increases contagious presenteeism, it would hold that too much paid sick leave increases the opposite, noncontagious absenteeism (i.e., workers staying home when they aren't actually sick).
Employers may be getting confused over local sick leave ordinances that exceed state standards.