shrinking asset

Shrinking Asset

1. An asset that depreciates. For example, an automobile is a shrinking asset because it loses value over time due to its limited useful life. Shrinking assets are important in taxation: one pays less in taxes on an asset the more it depreciates. See also: Absolute physical life.

2. An asset that is consumed. These shrinking assets are usually commodities; for example, a trucking company may buy a large amount of gasoline, which could theoretically be resold or liquidated, but is in fact used in the operation of the trucking company.

shrinking asset

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"We expect KORES' strategic importance to the Korean government will be less comparable with the other rated core government-related issuers in Korea over the next 2-3 years, given its shrinking asset base and reductions in new investments," adds Yoo.
gradually declining earnings from the bank's shrinking asset base, leads
Recent memories of shrinking asset values may damp consumers' motivation to ramp up their expenditures immediately.
The momentum generated in 2007-08 with new fund launches was severely undermined with weak fund performance and a shrinking asset base.
According to the Hymans Robertson Midlands Pension Index, which tracks the financial health of 11 major pension schemes based in the Midlands, the combined deficit of the schemes has increased from around pounds 4.3 billion to pounds 4.7 billion due to shrinking asset values.
So this issue of The Business Owner hits even harder: how to reduce costs, cut spending, deal with adversity, change your viewpoints, find the silver lining, take advantage of shrinking asset values and, yes, understand and face bankruptcy:
This is true even if income remains constant, as ROI will increase as a result [TABULAR DATA OMITTED] of a shrinking asset base.
Given the hangover of outstanding debt and recent memories of shrinking asset values, consumers may not be motivated to ramp up their expenditures.
Holland Cooke, a radio con-sultant from Rhode Island, said there are two trends contributing to this development: I luge radio corporations are shouldering enormous debt, leading to shrinking assets in small-and medium-market stations, and younger audiences are losing interest in shows patterned after leading talk show hosts.
Unlike the leverage ratio, where the only remedies are increasing capital or shrinking assets, credit unions can also manage their balance sheet mix (risk) to remain well capitalized under the risk-based requirement.
Given their shrinking assets in this climate of austerity, the least they can pledge is moral support.
Baby Boomers are increasingly becoming aware of the risk of shrinking assets. In fact, they fear this more than death.