short-interest ratio

Short Interest Ratio

In technical analysis and fundamental analysis, a ratio of the short-sold shares of a publicly traded company to the trading volume over a given period of time. This is an indication of the market's sentiment regarding a particular stock. A higher ratio indicates a feeling that the stock will decline in value, while a lower ratio indicates general belief that it will rise. It is not an exact indication, as it fails to take into account matters such as the potential exercise of convertible shares. Fundamental analysts interpret a high ratio as bearish because it shows an expectation for lower prices; on the other hand, technical analysts see a middling ratio as bullish as it may indicate a demand for a stock among hedge funds unable to cover a short sale. The short interest ratio is also called days to cover. See also: Hedge fund.

short-interest ratio

A ratio that is used for market analysis and is calculated by dividing short interest by average daily volume. Technicians use the short-interest ratio as a tool to determine market direction. A relatively high ratio is generally considered bullish because it indicates significant future buying pressures as short sellers cover their short positions. A low ratio is considered bearish. Also called days to cover.
References in periodicals archive ?
This investigation considers the influence of competitive actions on two distinct stock market outcomes of a given firm: cumulative abnormal returns and the short-interest ratio. Whereas cumulative returns captures the reactions of all investor types, the short-interest ratio captures the reactions of only short-sellers.
Short-interest ratio on the stock, which measures investor bets that the share price will decline, climbed to 2.9 per cent at the close of trade, the highest since January.
Commonly used sentiment indicators include the volatility index, put/call ratio, short-interest ratio, and insider trading activity.