short-interest ratio

Short Interest Ratio

In technical analysis and fundamental analysis, a ratio of the short-sold shares of a publicly traded company to the trading volume over a given period of time. This is an indication of the market's sentiment regarding a particular stock. A higher ratio indicates a feeling that the stock will decline in value, while a lower ratio indicates general belief that it will rise. It is not an exact indication, as it fails to take into account matters such as the potential exercise of convertible shares. Fundamental analysts interpret a high ratio as bearish because it shows an expectation for lower prices; on the other hand, technical analysts see a middling ratio as bullish as it may indicate a demand for a stock among hedge funds unable to cover a short sale. The short interest ratio is also called days to cover. See also: Hedge fund.

short-interest ratio

A ratio that is used for market analysis and is calculated by dividing short interest by average daily volume. Technicians use the short-interest ratio as a tool to determine market direction. A relatively high ratio is generally considered bullish because it indicates significant future buying pressures as short sellers cover their short positions. A low ratio is considered bearish. Also called days to cover.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the stock still has a short-interest ratio of 4.
7 million shares, resulting in a short-interest ratio of 1.
Further confusing matters is the fact that the stock's short-interest ratio declined, while the float/short ratio jumped to more than 13 percent.
The equity with a short-interest ratio of 261 days to cover (that's just over a year's worth of trading days) is SCO Group (SCOX).
Additionally, the equity makes this table for a reason, and that reason is the short-interest ratio of 34.
Without further ado, here are some of the largest short-interest ratios on the NYSE and Nasdaq exchanges.
Meanwhile, the short-interest configuration also has some promise, with the stock's short-interest ratio indicating that it would take nearly seven days to buy back all of the DIS shares sold short.
5 percent in the August reporting period, leaving the stock with a middle-of-the-road short-interest ratio of 3.
This amounts to a piddling short-interest ratio of 1.