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Related to shoplifting: shoplifting prevention

Shop

Wall Street slang for a firm.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Shop

1. Among workers on Wall Street, informal for a company, especially a publicly-traded company.

2. To seek out the best bid price or ask price possible for a security by contacting a large number of broker-dealers.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

shop

A dealership in securities.

shop

To contact a number of dealers in a security in an effort to obtain the most advantageous bid or ask price.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

shop

a business premise which is engaged in the retailing of products to customers who visit the shop or store to make purchases. The range of merchandise they stock and sell varies considerably from, at one extreme, total specialization on the one product (as in a shoe shop, for example) to retail operations involving thousands of different lines (as in a large DEPARTMENT STORE). Shop sizes too vary considerably, ranging upwards from small ‘corner shop’ premises to massive ‘hypermarket'complexes (see SUPERMARKET). See RETAIL OUTLET, RETAILER, DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

shop

or

store

a business premise that is engaged in the retailing of products to customers who visit the shop to make purchases. The range of merchandise that is stocked and sold varies considerably from, at one extreme, total specialization in one product (a ‘shoe shop’, for example) to retail operations involving thousands of different lines (as in a large DEPARTMENT STORE). Shop sizes too vary considerably, ranging upwards from small ‘corner shop’ premises to massive hypermarket complexes (see SUPERMARKET). See RETAIL OUTLET, RETAILER, DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
I remember one guy who gave up shoplifting and said 'my daughter is getting older and is starting to understand what I am doing.
Incomplete figures from 27 forces show there were a further 46,973 shoplifting incidents, and an additional 1,659 thefts against the person, at supermarkets during 2018, up until the end of the summer.
Merseyside Police says city centre shoplifting is FALLING and that the city remains one of the safest in the UK.
The increase seen in parts of the West Midlands reflects a sharp rise in shoplifting seen across the country as a whole.
"We need fresh thinking from Government and the police, because when shop theft is not tackled properly it has implications for the wider society." However, the government has said that the monetary threshold put on shoplifting investigations does not diminish the seriousness of these crimes.
Three players were arrested and accused of shoplifting from a Louis Vuitton store while the UCLA basketball team was on a trip to China for its season-opening game.
Cases of shoplifting were the most common type of crime but this was closely followed by eight reports of anti-social behaviour.
Spurious statements such as this do nothing to enlighten your readers as to the incidence of shoplifting or the geographical domicile of the offenders.
Gateshead was the only borough in Tyne and Wear with a below-average rate of shoplifting.
There were 2,581 recorded cases of shoplifting in Kirklees in the 12 months up to and including June 2015, an increase of more than 300 compared with the previous 12-month period.
Retail security experts in recent years attributed the rise in shoplifting to several factors, including more people feeling desperate economically, retailers operating with leaner staffs and police forces cutting back or putting less emphasis on shoplifting calls.