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Shop

Wall Street slang for a firm.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Shop

1. Among workers on Wall Street, informal for a company, especially a publicly-traded company.

2. To seek out the best bid price or ask price possible for a security by contacting a large number of broker-dealers.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

shop

A dealership in securities.

shop

To contact a number of dealers in a security in an effort to obtain the most advantageous bid or ask price.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

shop

a business premise which is engaged in the retailing of products to customers who visit the shop or store to make purchases. The range of merchandise they stock and sell varies considerably from, at one extreme, total specialization on the one product (as in a shoe shop, for example) to retail operations involving thousands of different lines (as in a large DEPARTMENT STORE). Shop sizes too vary considerably, ranging upwards from small ‘corner shop’ premises to massive ‘hypermarket'complexes (see SUPERMARKET). See RETAIL OUTLET, RETAILER, DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

shop

or

store

a business premise that is engaged in the retailing of products to customers who visit the shop to make purchases. The range of merchandise that is stocked and sold varies considerably from, at one extreme, total specialization in one product (a ‘shoe shop’, for example) to retail operations involving thousands of different lines (as in a large DEPARTMENT STORE). Shop sizes too vary considerably, ranging upwards from small ‘corner shop’ premises to massive hypermarket complexes (see SUPERMARKET). See RETAIL OUTLET, RETAILER, DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Aziz Ahmad, who runs AZ Phones on Peel Street, said he has been targeted by shoplifters four times in the last two years, and welcomed the new tactic.
Read on to learn more about what Clubb and the Buchheit team are doing to lessen external theft in their stores, and how businesses of any size can make their stores safer and help deter shoplifters.
"We have even found that some shoplifters will take orders, from a restaurant or bar in New Hampshire or from another state, for what liquor to steal," he said.
There are, however, different types of shoplifters. Most shoplifters, Bregar said, are "impulse shoplifters." "A lot of the time, they are normal people who give in to temptation.
"About 80 per cent of the crimes in the shopping centre are perpetrated by 20 per cent of the shoplifters," he said.
So uncritical was the programme that shoplifters like Chris and Abbie were happy to go on and brag about their crimes, and be filmed taking orders from potential customers.
Kashmir Arya, a retail manager at H&M, said the store is a major target for shoplifters. "Some of them travel across the GCC but their favourite is Dubai, especially during the shopping festival or Summer Surprises because stores get busy due to discounts offered.
The shoplifter dropped some of the clothing and paused to pick it up as he made his exit from the shop on Halslall Lane in Formby.
Politicians claiming expenses for ridiculous--and sometimes non-existent--items is theft pure and simple, but on a much greater scale than that of the aforementioned shoplifter. No political chicanery can hide that.
After the hearing city centre beat officer PC Guy James said: "Price is the most prolific shoplifter in Devon and Cornwall."
Retailers say that the average shoplifter is a 35-year-old male, but apart from that it is hard to make general assumptions, reported the online edition of the Danish newspaper Copenhagen Post.
Age-appropriate presentations developed for elementary, middle and high schools examine why people shoplift, the procedures in place to protect property, and the cost of shoplifting to the shoplifter, as well as the community.