Shirking

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Shirking

The tendency to do less work when the return is smaller. Owners may have more incentive to shirk if they issue equity as opposed to debt, because they retain less ownership interest in the company and therefore may receive a smaller return. Thus, shirking is considered an agency cost of equity.

Shirking

The act of working less when there is no chance of earning a higher return. For example, a company may have punitive taxes levied on it if its profits are considered excessive. The owners of the company therefore have an incentive to shirk their responsibilities and to not work as hard as they otherwise would. Likewise, employees who are paid poorly may shirk their responsibilities since there is no incentive rewarding hard work.

shirking

see TEAM PRODUCTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The upward-sloping shirking function illustrated in Figure 2 is consistent with the hypothesis that players are less likely to shirk when contract negotiations approach (i.
Yet, in Shapiro's and Stiglitz's logic, when one offers to shirk at [w.
The intent to stay away, combined with the knowledge that he was missing important service by staying away, was enough to establish his intent to shirk important service.
The worst nightmare of China's leaders is a national protest movement of discontented groups--unemployed workers, hard-pressed farmers, and students--united against the regime by the shared fervor of nationalism," Shirk concludes.
Some of the attorneys and administrators Shirk fired worked on the high-profile case of Brendan Butler, a 16-year-old wrongly accused of robbing and murdering an elderly tourist in 2000.
As a former deputy assistant secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Shirk writes with authority on U.
All the little responsibilities and commitments we keep or shirk have immense consequences, positive or negative.
Calhoun, who died in January at age 82, didn't shirk from attracting attention to herself-if it would further a cause.
But he is coming after auditors who shirk their duties or engage in anything illicit.
This examination assists in specifying "the conditions under which we would expect civilians to monitor the military intrusively or nonintrusively and the conditions under which we would expect the military to work or shirk.