Israeli New Sheqel

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Israeli New Sheqel

The currency of Israel. It replaced the old sheqel in 1985 due to the former currency's high rate of inflation. The new sheqel is a floating currency, and because it is traded on the Merc, it is one of the few currencies for which futures and other derivative contracts are widely available. The new sheqel is a hard currency, indicating consumer confidence on the foreign exchange markets. See also: Currency pair.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the government had paid the basic salaries of public servants for April with a maximum of 10,000 shekels ($2,770), it did not set a maximum amount of disbursement for May salaries.
Because Al-Qawasmi was married and had a child, the PA pays his family 400 shekels extra for his wife and 200 shekels extra for the child, in addition to the basic allowance of 1,400 shekels per month, PMW notes.
That done, paper currency could be made that converts either Palestinian or Galilean Silver Shekels. Throw in a little bitcoin technology and you have a fully functional monetary system.
Continue reading "Israelis Have Crowdfunded A Million Shekels for Syrian Children in Less Than a Week" at...
Caption: KINEGRAM VOLUME[R] foil stripe on Israel's New 50 Shekels banknote.
The Israeli cabinet will also approve a plan to allocate 1.5 million Shekels to develop residential complexes surrounding Gaza Strip over five years.
Abu Saeed, a Palestinian donor, complained that he was charged 30 Shekels for a pack of six bottles.
TEL AVyV (CyHAN)- Israeli Energy Minister Silvan Shalom said Monday that the state's revenues from its newly discovered gas fields are expected to double by 2015 and reach a total of one billion shekel (about 280 million U.S.
Lapid wants a cut of four billion shekels ($1.12 billion, 860 million euros) to help plug a budget deficit expected to be capped at 4.65 percent of gross domestic product this year and three percent in 2014.
Ben Zvi, who purchased the troubled, more than 60-year-old Ma'ariv last month, has said workers earning more than 22,000 shekels per month would have to take pay cuts, The Times of Israel reported.