Israeli New Sheqel

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Israeli New Sheqel

The currency of Israel. It replaced the old sheqel in 1985 due to the former currency's high rate of inflation. The new sheqel is a floating currency, and because it is traded on the Merc, it is one of the few currencies for which futures and other derivative contracts are widely available. The new sheqel is a hard currency, indicating consumer confidence on the foreign exchange markets. See also: Currency pair.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Against the currencies of Israel's main trading partners, in terms of the nominal effective exchange rate of the shekel (i.e., the trade-weighted average shekel exchange rate against those currencies), the shekel strengthened by about 1.6 percent.
Danon should learn of the Tyrian Shekel which was first minted in 126 BC with Greek letters.
In 2013, the state's incomes from payment of gas royalties and tax are expected to reach 500 million shekel (about 140 million dollars), Shalom told the Knesset's (parliament) Finance Committee.
Shares of Delek Drilling were down 0.5 percent at 13.63 shekels in early afternoon trade in Tel Aviv.
France-based BNP Paribas (BNPP.PA) has announced that the value of the shekel may increase as the central bank is expected to lift rates.
Based on the central bank's representative rate for the currency, which is set daily and used for valuations and contracts, the shekel started the year at 3.775 to the U.S.
BNP advises clients to take "long" positions in the rand, shekel and lira while "shorting" the Hungarian forint, Polish zloty and Czech koruna, Elisabeth Gruie, an emerging-market currency strategist in London, told Bloomberg agency.
"So the shekel has become very very strong," he said.
"As economic activity increases, the shekel collects here in the system.
With each tribe presenting a silver bowl that weighed 130 shekels, a silver basin that weighed 70 shekels.
Ibbi-Ilabrat, son of Warad-Sin, rents a house to Nigia for one year for one shekel of silver.
In Leviticus (27:25), we read: "Every valuation shall be according to the shekel of the sanctuary." Some conclude that the Jews were accustomed to keep a shekel weighing four drachmas of silver in the sanctuary to ensure easy recourse to a legitimate shekel, so that no one would dare to falsify it by tampering with its quality and weight.