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Share

A certificate giving the person or company listed a portion of ownership in a stock, mutual fund, or some other investment vehicle. A share is the smallest unit of ownership. They may be bought or sold on or off an exchange.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

share

1. A single unit of a class of ownership in a corporation, represented by a stock certificate.
2. A single unit of ownership in a mutual fund.
3. The portion of a market controlled by a particular firm.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Share.

A share is a unit of ownership in a corporation or mutual fund, or an interest in a general or limited partnership. Though the word is sometimes used interchangeably with the word stock, you actually own shares of stock.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

share

a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by a JOINT-STOCK COMPANY as a means of raising long-term capital. Purchasers of shares pay money into the company's bank account and in return receive a SHARE CERTIFICATE signifying their ownership of the shares and have their ownership recorded in the company's SHARE REGISTER. The SHAREHOLDERS of a company are its legal owners and are entitled to a share in its profits. Shares are traded on the STOCK MARKET. There are two broad kinds of shares: PREFERENCE SHARES and ORDINARY SHARES. See also SHARE CAPITAL, SHARE ISSUE, CAPITAL GEARING.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

share

a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by a JOINT-STOCK COMPANY as a means of raising long-term capital. Purchasers of shares pay money to the company and in return receive a SHARE CERTIFICATE signifying their ownership of the shares and have their ownership recorded in the company's SHARE REGISTER. The SHAREHOLDERS of a company are its legal owners and are entitled to a share in its profits, receiving some of these profits in the form of DIVIDENDS. Shares are traded on the STOCK EXCHANGE. There are two broad kinds of shares: PREFERENCE SHARES and ORDINARY SHARES. See SHARE CAPITAL, SHARE ISSUE, CAPITAL GEARING.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The obvious challenge of shared data clusters is maintaining data integrity without degrading application performance.
There are several specific challenges to maintaining data integrity in a shared environment:
* Cooperative acquisitions--supporting a shared acquisitions program including shared database and shared discounts and cooperative collection building
* Database management--management of a shared database including protocols and operations
QoS algorithms may actually provide a solution, but the performance degradation of these types of solutions generally provides little or no advantage over shared bandwidth architectures.
Replacing shared bandwidth infrastructures with switched infrastructures provides the benefits of reliability, availability, serviceability and performance while scaling.
In a shared nothing web cluster, multiple web servers share common client access, but each accesses its own "read-mostly" copy of the data.
The shared nothing scenario; with each server accessing its own copy of the web data, is illustrated on the left side of Figure 2.
Collection development librarians were the ones best positioned to identify and select appropriate titles to stock this shared collection of lesser-used research materials.
The payoff for making interlibrary lending and borrowing work better will be immediate and can take advantage of the existing shared collection.
Furthermore, there should be flexibility in the use of a three-year period for determining the proportionality of costs shared. The use of a strict three-year period is particularly inappropriate in respect of start-up ventures that may not generate revenues - let alone operating profits - for several years.
The IRS invites comments on the appropriate accounting principles to employ in determining the shared costs of intangibles.(69) To minimize the administrative burdens that the regulations place on taxpayers, TEI recommends that the development costs subject to a cost-sharing arrangement be determined by applying generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) rather than tax accounting principles.