Setoff

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Setoff

Money held on behalf of a borrower that may be applied to repay the loan, but usually without the permission of the borrower.

Setoff

1. The ability of a debtor to reduce the amount of one's debt by an amount the creditor owes to the debtor. Thus, if a debtor owes a creditor $20,000 but the creditor owes the debtor $5,000 in an unrelated matter, setoff allows the debtor effectively to owe only $15,000.

2. In banking, the right of a bank to seize a debtor's account balance held at that bank if a debt is in or near default. Some jurisdictions limit the right of setoff; for example, the United States does not allow it to apply for commercial loans or credit card debt.
References in periodicals archive ?
81) While Rothstein J accepted the conventional view that a bare right of contractual set-off does not create a security interest, he was of the view that the addition of a series of contractual encumbrances designed to maintain or preserve the deposit account balance for an effective set-off, pushes the transaction, as a matter of substance, over the threshold: (82)
Unlike a bare right of contractual set-off, the flawed asset arrangement is not a "truncated" form of security.
In the previous subpart, I described the flawed asset arrangement as the contractual preservation of an account through a restriction on withdrawal, coupled with the remedial mechanism of set-off.
I suspect, however, that a Canadian court, faced with the above questions, would force a pro tanto set-off of the Bank's loan balance against the notional deposit account balance on the basis that Al has some equitable or reversionary entitlement to the latter.
In a display of cognitive dissonance, Loxton steadfastly maintains--notwithstanding his last three sentences--that the flawed asset arrangement does not involve or require set-off.
Indeed, the very essence of the flawed asset arrangement is the assurance it provides to the account debtor (under the flawed asset) that he or she will be paid on his or her reciprocal account via the remedial mechanism of set-off.
B establishes that the security interest threshold is not crossed via non-contractual set-off (Scenario A) or bare contractual set-off (Scenario B).
For instance, it is not entirely clear from Justice Rothstein's reasons whether a right of contractual set-off, coupled with a negative pledge clause but absent a preservation element, crosses the transactional threshold.
111) Indeed, whether flawed asset provisions or bare contractual set-off provisions, such provisions constitute "terms of the contract between the account debtor (the depository bank) and the assignor (customer)" which, pursuant to PPSA paragraph 41(2)(a), supersede a competing security interest.
The PPSA does not treat set-off and security interests as mutually exclusive.
One could argue that, by virtue of putting a flawed asset arrangement in place, a depository bank elects to relinquish, or forfeit, its freestanding contractual set-off rights.
Those who as a matter of principle or reflex oppose policies that benefit the bank industry will be bothered by my assertion that a banks unregistered right of contractual set-off prevails over a registered PPSA security interest.