Point

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Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
8 kV 12 kV Set point L/r = 10 L/r = 100 L/r = 1000 L/r = 10 L/r = 100 L/r = 1000 2 0.
Of the three oven adjustments, the zone set points have the biggest effect on the peak temperature and TAL.
Serena fought off three more set points and finally gained an advantage at 8-7 before winning the match when Venus hit a shot long.
Serial" structure tracks the set point very precise but can be sensible at important disturbances ;
The women who had acquired these genetically diverse virus populations also had significantly higher viral set points and significantly lower CD4+ counts four to 24 months after infection than did those with only one strain of the virus.
The valve makes the temperature correction automatically to maintain the high limit set point.
The happiness set point is represented by a straight line parallel to the x-axis.
DENVER -- It's high time to toss out the long-popular set point theory of obesity, according to speakers at an international conference of the Academy for Eating Disorders.
The reduction in energy expenditure that results is said to be responsible for the often-observed scenario in which the individual regains the weight that was lost and thereby returns to his or her set point.
Seal integrity is maintained until 98% of set point and reseats at 95-97% (compared to typical 90%:85% values).
Support for the genetic set point comes from comparative studies of identical twins (who share identical genes) and of fraternal twins (who share roughly 50 percent of their genes), as well as from psychological studies of individuals.