Semiconductor

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Semiconductor

Any substance that conducts electricity more slowly than a conductor. Semiconductors are common in products like computer chips and, as such, may be traded as commodities. Silicon and germanium are both semiconductors.
References in periodicals archive ?
To Semiconducting Materials and Solar Energy group, Chemistry Department Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, and Catalonia Institute for Energy Research IREC.
So it is critical to develop methods to induce a band gap in graphene to make it a relevant semiconducting material," he added.
The resistivity and Hall mobility of semiconducting materials are fundamental properties investigated during product and process development.
By combining Solarmer's device engineering expertise with Yu and Liang's semiconducting material, they have been able to push the material's efficiency even higher.
Whenever current runs through wires, such as those embedded within the semiconducting material of an integrated circuit, it creates a magnetic field.
The technologies showcased are a Hydrogen Energy System using Nitride Photocatalyst, Direct Thermal-to-electric Power Generator Development using Environmentally-benign Semiconducting Material, and Development of Si-free Thin Film Solar Cells.
A conventional FET contains a sliver of a semiconducting material with a so-called "source" electrode at one end and a "drain" electrode at the other.
Kilby joined Texas Instruments in 1958 and that same year conceived of and built the first electronic circuit that contained all of its components on a single piece of semiconducting material.
In effect, the signal is converted from a wave that travels at the speed of light into one that travels at the speed of sound in a semiconducting material, then back into a speed-of-light wave.
In the May 1 Physical Review Letters, the two scientists describe how to combine two laser beams in such a way that their phase difference causes optically stimulated electrons to move right or left in a semiconducting material.
That's why scientists have been eyeing melt-resistant synthetic diamond as a semiconducting material that could go where no silicon chip has gone before.
An individual molecule, or even several molecules, of semiconducting material will behave differently from an ordinary "bulk" semiconductor, explains Brus.