sellers' market


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Bull Market

A market for a security, commodity, currency, or anything else where prices are consistently increasing. For example, if an index increases 10-20% over a relatively brief period of time, it is said to be in a bull market. There is a great deal of money that can be made in a bull market, but the danger exists that a bull market can undergo a price correction or become a speculative bubble. See also: Bear market.

sellers' market

A market in which the demand for an asset swamps supply to the point that prices rise above the level that would have been expected under more usual circumstances. A new issue in great demand by investors is an example of a sellers' market. Underwriters may have to allocate available shares of the issue to their clients, resulting in sharply higher prices once the shares begin trading in the secondary market. Compare buyers' market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wood said that when "pending activity is growing twice as fast as new inventory, the market shifts further in the direction of a sellers' market."
When inventory falls below six months, the market typically is considered a sellers' market, in which home sellers can demand higher prices and buyers face higher prices and less selection.
"It's making (the market) swing more so in the direction of a sellers' market and is tightening the market even more."
The Japanese real estate market is still experiencing an unprecedented slump, marked by a continued acceleration of falling land prices in some core cities and a sellers' market that is generally soft and inactive, according to a year-end analysis by real estate investment company Kennedy-Wilson International (Nasdaq: KWIC), which has a major Japanese division.