self-correcting

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Self-Correcting

Describing a situation where a trend is likely to reverse itself and restore the status quo. For example, if a security drops in price by $5, a self-correcting trend would provide some indication that it will soon rise (roughly) $5 to its previous price. See also: Reversion to the Mean.

self-correcting

Of, relating to, or being a security price movement that is excessive and likely to be at least partially retraced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intentional self-interpreting is often represented by cases of self-correction when the child realizes that s/ he has chosen some words from the "wrong" language.
Like examples of self-correction, self-interpreted utterances are discussed in Saunders 1988 to show the development of metalinguistic awareness in the bilingual development of his children.
This assisted me in determining methods for supporting Vlad's skill in overcoming word reading errors and improving his self-correction rate.
He was encouraged to make self-corrections if he sorted a word in the wrong category.
Since it is only the learners who are actually capable of making permanent changes to their interlanguage systems, it has been generally assumed that self-correction is the most beneficial way of repairing communication breakdowns.
Self-corrections are also learning indicators of the speaker's reflexive work on his/her own discourse: (s)he corrects a word or a syntaxic structure:
(1995), self-corrections are expected to interrupt either upward or downward efficacy-performance spirals when accurate and specific feedback is provided because it results in improved understanding of task intricacies and the gaps between actual performance and specifications.
A January 1997 policy statement -- the administrative policy regarding self-corrections -- permits certain plan operating mistakes to be corrected without sanctions before an audit begins.
Step 7: Flip the transparency for self-checking and self-corrections, if necessary.
In the area of literacy, the tutee, in a cross-age tutoring program, makes substantial gains in sight vocabulary, reading accuracy, self-corrections, comprehension, and reading age.
law and policy is capable of significant self-correction, though bloodshed has been required," says Jones.