Secular

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Secular

Long-term time frame (10-50 years or more).

Secular Market

A market as defined by its overarching, long-term trends. Generally, a secular market refers to trends over a period of five or more years. A secular market may be bullish or bearish, and, in market analysis, takes precedence over opposite, short-term trends that happen within the secular market. For example, the Great Depression in the United States lasted from 1929 until World War II (certainly a bearish secular market). Even though some years saw significant GDP growth (including 14.2% growth in 1936), this did not prevent the secular market from being bearish. Thus, a secular market describes general trends in the market without regard for anomalous trends in the interim. See also: Cyclical market.
References in periodicals archive ?
The classical conception of secularization was presented by Max Weber within his sociology of religion where secularization was presented mostly as the compromise between the religious values and the values of secular institutions.
The authoritarian-laic pattern, which constitutes the dominant secularization pattern in Tunisia, is represented by the winning party of the 2014 elections, Nidaa Tounes and its leader Essebsi, who led the liberals, leftists and the former regime factions.
Chapter 4, the Polarized Mosaic, is arguably the most important contribution of the work, as it details Bibby's approach to measuring religious polarization and corroborates his plain-spoken rebuttal to much of contemporary sociology of religion's stubborn emphasis on either secularization or desecularization.
Many studies have found a positive association between economic development and secularization. Inglehart and Baker (2000), for example, investigate modernization across countries by computing a secular value index from the World Value Surveys and find a significant and quantitatively important association of income per capita and the secular value index.
In particular, I want to contrast Catholic approaches to secularization in the 1960s with the conversation on secularization today.
As such, the book will be of great interest to scholars in Middle Eastern studies, Ottoman studies, secularization and modernization studies, and the sociology of religion.
Contrary to the secularization thesis, which was developed in the past few decades by prominent scholars in the sociology of religion--supporting the idea that as a society becomes modern, the need for religion will decrease--recent global developments indicate that a direct link between scientific-economic progress and secularization is less obvious than has been thought.
In the Arab world secularization was also an integral part of the modernization processes under military dictatorships.
The pope said at the time of the inauguration of the council that one of the reasons behind its creation was that secularization had caused "a serious crisis" of the sense of the Christian faith and the role of the church.
Bringing many texts into gothic criticism for the first time, Gothic Riffs relies on a similar method, for it often provides a quick plot summary, juxtaposes similar texts to highlight a repeated narrative scenario, interprets that scenario as a means of working through a basic cultural problem, and links that problem to the wider process of secularization. As a result, this study often elides many complicating factors, such as key details of the texts it examines or a panoply of theoretical questions to which its argument gives rise, emphasizing instead how the period's texts construct "a few fairly basic cultural scripts ...
It is clear from his account that, while secularization was not a monopoly of the wealthy, they were everywhere well represented in the ranks of libertines and scoffers.
From the questions of multiple jurisdictions in Canada (5) to United States Supreme Court decisions on the use of tax payers' money to fund religious themed displays in public spaces (6) to debates about the Islamic veil in France (7), recent debates on secularization focus predominantly on application.