Secular

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Secular

Long-term time frame (10-50 years or more).

Secular Market

A market as defined by its overarching, long-term trends. Generally, a secular market refers to trends over a period of five or more years. A secular market may be bullish or bearish, and, in market analysis, takes precedence over opposite, short-term trends that happen within the secular market. For example, the Great Depression in the United States lasted from 1929 until World War II (certainly a bearish secular market). Even though some years saw significant GDP growth (including 14.2% growth in 1936), this did not prevent the secular market from being bearish. Thus, a secular market describes general trends in the market without regard for anomalous trends in the interim. See also: Cyclical market.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authoritarian-laic pattern, which constitutes the dominant secularization pattern in Tunisia, is represented by the winning party of the 2014 elections, Nidaa Tounes and its leader Essebsi, who led the liberals, leftists and the former regime factions.
Secularization in this sense could be celebrated or mourned or turned into an opportunity for the church--as it was by some theologians--but it was widely accepted as fact by sociologists of religion in the 1960s.
The correlation between modernization and Christianity in Korean history shows a classic example against secularization theory claiming that modernization undermines religion.
What does the new mission affirmation say about these spiritual struggles between secularization and the resurgence of religion in western Europe?
Scholars of romantic-era writing have typically conceived of secularization through the lens of canonic lyrical poetry.
In light of his earlier work on the baskalab, it should be no surprise that Feiner's account is more than a social history of secularization.
In The Sacred Canopy, Peter Berger defines secularization as "the process by which sectors of society and culture are removed from the domination of religious institutions and symbols".
Cynical secularization of the sacred by the "Islamic" states is alienating many Muslim citizens.
The chapters that address grand theories of secularization include especially spirited work.
However, the book is more than just a reconsideration of natural theology, as Jager's basic argument revises (and finally rejects) a central premise of secularization theory and an equally important belief of much Romantic literary history: namely, that Romanticism is instrumental in the secularization of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe and that Romantic poets were primarily trying to overcome or abandon Christianity.
In this article the religiousness of educated Iranian youth and its type has been focused on and based on this the secularization theory has been examined.
The Plot to Kill God: Findings from the Soviet Experiment in Secularization, by Paul Froese.