Secular

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Secular

Long-term time frame (10-50 years or more).

Secular Market

A market as defined by its overarching, long-term trends. Generally, a secular market refers to trends over a period of five or more years. A secular market may be bullish or bearish, and, in market analysis, takes precedence over opposite, short-term trends that happen within the secular market. For example, the Great Depression in the United States lasted from 1929 until World War II (certainly a bearish secular market). Even though some years saw significant GDP growth (including 14.2% growth in 1936), this did not prevent the secular market from being bearish. Thus, a secular market describes general trends in the market without regard for anomalous trends in the interim. See also: Cyclical market.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Wohlrab-Sahr (2016) points out, secularity also regards the sorts of differentiation or separation between religion and other societal spheres and practices determining the proper framework for religious and non-religious attitudes and behaviours.
The most striking feature of Headley's book is his brilliantly nuanced discussion of secularity's emergence from Christianity.
it is--as crucially important to the development of secularity. It may also be relevant to point at antifoundationalist philosophers like Gianni Vattimo, who uses the concept of "weak thought" rather than Taylor's "super goods" to make a case for the continued relevance of religion.
The dichotomy of religion and modern secularity may also be overemphasized.
It is important because through colonialism and globalization, aspects of the North Atlantic experience of secularity have shaped political and religious lives, subjectivities, and forms of collective governance all over the world, including Latin America.
Interactions between four select concepts--religion and magic, secularity and spirituality--are connected, defined, and then redefined in respect to relations of power within imperial and national institutions.
A divided world has rendered secularity a source of insanity and aggression, and it has made religion vapid and unhelpful or fanatic and dangerous.
This, in turn, necessitated a re-appraisal of secularity, and of the ways in which holiness can characterize an engagement with the secular in the life of a Christian.
Mortal Thoughts: Religion, Secularity, and Identity in Early Modern Culture.
A key paradox is derived from the country-specific chapters: on one hand there is a "relatively high level of secularity in most if not all of Europe," and on the other, there is a "marked resurgence of religion in public debate." The progress of secularity in European states is a well-established fact.
Not political secularism, which already presumes the stability of certain categories (state, religion, law, majority/ minority) and can be localized to a specific regime, but the political secular, that is, political-philosophical consequences of the discursive formation of European secularity. According to the grammar of this episteme, that is, the European "entrenchment" in a "secular space of subjectivity ...
The Turkish army asked him to step down in 1997 to protect the secularity of the state against Islamic fundamentalism and he was banned from political activity.