sector theory

sector theory

A land-use theory that says development tends to grow along transportation corridors outward from the city, forming wedge-shaped areas that follow the path of least resistance and most economy.

References in periodicals archive ?
Chapman went into that match with his sector theory, intending also to keep the ball near the side walls to hamper Walsh's big Irish-whip swing.
These include the economic base theory, staple theory, sector theory, and classical liberty theory.
This study offers initial insight into the challenges of private sector theory implementation in public sector structures and administrations, but further precise empirical research is needed.
Section III then discusses the more prominent responses to critics, namely third sector theory and treasury efficiency.
The officials at External Affairs distanced themselves from the Foreign Office as they explored complex ideas about effective occupation, the sector theory, and international law as they pertained to the Arctic Archipelago.
A fourth non-profit sector theory that we want to include in our theoretical framework is the social origin theory.
(1995) "Like ships in the night: feminism and third sector theory" Third Sector Review, 1:39-53.
The sector theory has fared somewhat better at the regional level.
Facing this reality, Wicksell passed over the early efforts at modeling a public sector theory based on known preferences, proceeding directly to what might be done to design a formulation which would be useful at the practical level.
The review of the "sector theory" with which Canada and Russia have from time to time sought to assert their territorial and maritime claims in the Arctic and that of the status of ice in international law are particularly detailed; the author undertakes a comprehensive review of both Western and Soviet scholars.
These demarcation lines did not mean borders for the polar sector and adoption of the sector theory (Butler, 1978).