person

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person

Legally, any natural or artificial person, which would include corporations, partnerships, associations, and limited liability companies. If it is important to distinguish among the “persons” who may do something or who are prohibited from doing something, relevant contracts, leases, or statutes will usually define the term.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, without the second person address of the divine You, there is no divine Other.
. "A Thing of Beauty" and "Second Person." The Miner's Pale Children.
Part 3, "The Night Chanter," is partly written in the second person.
Diego sections are in the second person. Present-tense narrative.
Rita Gnutzmann's informative article on what she calls "the novel in the second person" ("la novela...
The major three types of second-person story (viewed from the perspective of their relation to a realist reading of the text) are (a) "I" and "you" narratives (in which the narrator shares a fictional past with the narratee and can therefore be "in the know" about it); (b) the entirely nonrealistic case of a pure rendering of a second person's consciousness; and (c) the playful metafictional case of a deliberate manipulation of the irreality and ambiguity factors of the second-person pronoun.
I will start with the use of the second person in St.
Max Frisch's "Burleske" - the narrative prose sketch from which his famous play Biedermann und die Brandstifter developed - is written in the second person, and it describes the bourgeois mentality to a T.
Such play with the ambiguity of the second person typically occurs at the beginning of texts, where - as we have noted - the reader appears to be addressed in person or as a generalized "you." At the end of texts one may also suddenly encounter a shift into a different frame: one discovers, for instance, that the addressee and protagonist is dead (although she or he appeared to be the recipient of the narrator's allocution); that this addressee-protagonist does not "really" exist, that he or she has merely been fantasized by the speaker; or one encounters narratives of internal focalization where the text suddenly acquires an addressee and then destroys the previous illusion of immediacy.(20)
I have documented such a case in "Second Person Fiction" by the example of Joyce Carol Oates's "You," where the "you" protagonist, the actress Madeline, emerges as the addressee of her daughter's discourse, and - in the final scene of the tale - one may (or may not) conclude that the entire discourse took place in the daughter's mind while she was waiting for her mother's arrival at the airport.

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