Spider

(redirected from search engine)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to search engine: Meta search engine, Google search engine

Spider

See: SPDRs

Spider

Also called a Standard & Poor's Depositary Receipt or a SPDR. An exchange-traded fund that tracks the Standard and Poor's 500. The organization issuing the SPDR owns each of the stocks traded on the S&P 500 in approximate ratio to their market capitalization. SPDR shares can be bought, sold, short-sold, traded on margin; they generally function as if they were stocks. Dividends are paid quarterly and are based on the accumulated dividends of all the stocks represented in the SPDR, less any expenses. Investors use SPDRs (and indeed all exchange-traded funds) as a way to easily diversify their portfolios at relatively low cost. Investors also see the demand for SPDRs as an indicator of which direction the market believes the S&P 500 is going. See also: Mid-Cap SPDR.

spider

References in periodicals archive ?
A search engine optimization company in charlottlesville, VA.
The perceived Affordance of web Search Engine. A Comparative Analysis.
Hypothesis 1b: Perceived search skills will positively impact users' specific search engine usage.
Perceived search engine reliance is the level of perceived reliance on search engines in the context of the user's employment.
Page Ranking: page ranking is process to provide weightage to the pages indexed by search engine. The relevancy of the web pages are depend on many factors, one of the important factors is page rank.
Like Chrome and Edge, Safari gives access to only one search engine in its address box and does not have a separate search box.
To calculate the retrieval precision of medical images in each of the search engines and Meta search engine, the following formula was used:
Wilmington, DE, April 13, 2015 --(PR.com)-- The Active Search Results Search Engine is pleased to announce the US Patent Office's approval for the Active Search Results (ASR) Page Ranking Technology patent.
Earlier, search engines used to count the number of times the search keyword appeared in the content to arrive at the keyword density of the webpage.
Speaking at the Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco, Hammer explained that the search engine would be focused on "deep search" and relational topics.
He explained that his search engine is different to Google in that it connects keywords to related topics, something he called "relationship search".
Google has been very successful in becoming the dominant search engine platform in the US and Western countries.