Scrub

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Related to scrub typhus: leptospirosis

Scrub

A slightly disrespectful term for a new or inexperienced employee.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, scrub typhus, unlike Rocky Mountain Fever, which is caused by tick bites, does not generally include a rash.
Since the area is endemic for scrub typhus, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay was performed on the serum for IgM antibodies for Orientia tsutsugamushi which came out to be positive.
Ever since the first detection of scrub typhus in Nagaland, health-care workers have taken immense measure in curbing the disease.
Conclusions: We found that abdominal CT manifestations of scrub typhus with elevated aminotransferases were varied and not specific.
Furthermore, even after the development of epididymo-orchitis we did not consider the diagnosis of scrub typhus as it is a very rare presentation.
Scrub typhus, also known as bush typhus, is a disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi.
Cascading effect of economic globalization on human risks of scrub typhus and tick-borne rickettsial diseases.
Sensitive microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies against the scrub typhus rickettsia, Rickettsia tsutsugamushi.
15) The incubation period and initial clinical manifestations of rickettsialpox mirror those of scrub typhus with eschar formation at the bite site within 10-12 days, followed by fever, chills, severe headache, conjunctival injection, and truncal maculopapular then vesicular rash.
It has also a worldwide distribution; and (c) Scrub typhus is caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi (formerly Rickettsia tsutsugamushi) transmitted via the mite belonging to the Leptotrombidium akamushi, and possibly Leptotrombidium deliense (1).
Rickettsia infections, particularly epidemic or louse-borne typhus, which emerges in situations of human upheaval such as war; the milder endemic or murine typhus in Europe and North Africa; and scrub typhus (Tutsugamushi fever) in the Far East, were major problems, affecting war-torn communities and combatants.