Score

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Special Claim on Residual Equity (SCORE)

A certificate that entitles the owner to the capital appreciation of an underlying security, but not to the dividend income from the security.

Score

In the United Kingdom, a slang term for 20 pounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Total Car Score's "Top Scoring Car Awards" name the top-scoring vehicle in 20 major automotive segments.
Ryan Griffin completed 11 of 23 passes for 186 yards and three touchdowns, connecting with Aubrey Smith on scoring tosses of 15 and 42 yards.
and chair of the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of New York, said customers generally accept the role that insurance scoring plays in the underwriting process.
It was fairly obvious in the original article that we were referring to computerized scoring of soft-linked items, rather than computer-administered testing, or computer adaptive testing (CAT) (e.
According to D&B, there's a 61% chance that applicants scoring in the 101-360 range will pay seriously late, compared to a 3% likelihood for those scoring in the 535-660 range.
We interviewed Miss Jackson to discuss the evaluation format and scoring procedure.
Insurance scoring is a powerful tool for insurers to use to segment risk, which allows insurers and agents to offer a broader range of products and prices to more consumers.
Copies of the teacher's final assessment task, scoring rubric and a sample set of scored student responses were submitted to the project evaluator.
As part of the contract, IntelliMetric[TM], Vantage Learning's automated essay scoring engine, scores applicants' responses to two types of prompts within each GMAT AWA assessment.
Adam Barry opened the scoring with a 27-yard pass to Nick Karam.
While noting the substantial progress made in recent years to incorporate credit scoring and prior loss history into homeowners underwriting and rating, Kucera wrote that "companies need to continue to look for ways to bring the occupants of a home into the equation.
There are three common variants in state accountability systems: some states, such as North Carolina, Arizona, and Tennessee, rate their schools with a measure of a school's value-added, using the growth in performance for a given group of students since the end of the preceding school year; other states, such as Texas and Illinois, rate their schools on the percentage of students scoring above certain thresholds; still other states, such as California, rate their schools based on their change in rest scores from one year to the next.