Score

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Special Claim on Residual Equity (SCORE)

A certificate that entitles the owner to the capital appreciation of an underlying security, but not to the dividend income from the security.

Score

In the United Kingdom, a slang term for 20 pounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hill's breakaway score in the 38th minute gave Granada Hills a 2-0 lead.
This study also revealed that both groups of students felt confident after instruction although their confidence did not correspond to their posttest scores.
If playing open scores is difficult for pianists with years of training, it is even more so for the instrumental or vocal music major who does not engage in piano study until his freshman year in college.
Bauer and his agency colleagues tell customers upfront that their insurance score will be made up of credit scoring, as well as their motor vehicle record and losses, and will be modeled on a number of different variables.
Hispanic children do not experience this widening test-score gap relative to otherwise similar white students; indeed, they systematically close the gap, perhaps because their initial scores are artificially low due to the relative inexperience with the English language among some immigrants and their children (see Figure 2).
Although typically used as an item discrimination index, PBCC is an item-total correlation, and hence, the square of it (PBCC-squared) is a measure of the proportion of variance in total test score that is predictable by an item.
He's making rehearsal scores not just for Concerto Barocco, but for two other seminal Balanchine ballets: Serenade and Apollo.
The science scores are in direct contrast to the 2000 mathematics assessment, released in August 2001, that showed significant improvement for fourth and eighth graders.
In a study in which 304 anesthesiologists assigned ASA scores to 10 hypothetical patients, the mean number of patients rated identically by the expert panel was 5.
These companies assign numerical values to "events" on an applicant's credit report--slow payments, maxed out credit cards, or bankruptcies, for example--then calculate them with other factors to arrive at a score.
In one study, people with high coronary calcium scores were five to six times as likely to develop heart disease as people with low calcium scores, says Yadon Arad of St.
When comparing our nurses and CNA's we found that the nurses had slightly higher scores in all areas.