scientific management


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scientific management

an approach to JOB DESIGN advocated by F. W. Taylor (1856-1915), an American WORK STUDY engineer. Taylor sought to increase output by improving management competence and by careful attention to job design. Specifically, he advocated close analysis of job tasks through the methods of work study as a basis for achieving an extreme degree of job specialization. All decisionmaking about task performance was to pass to management, who were to create ‘thinking departments’ to analyse and plan work tasks. Supervision of performance was to be undertaken by ‘functional foremen’, responsible for particular aspects of the production process (for example maintenance). Workers would be motivated by pay incentives to work to the full extent of their abilities, and the best workers should be selected for each particular job. Taylor believed that adoption of his system would lead to high levels of efficiency In reality his theory ignored the importance of JOB SATISFACTION. Adoption of his methods led to STRIKES and CONFLICT. See FORDISM, METHOD STUDY.
References in periodicals archive ?
As you can clearly see, scientific management hoovers head and shoulders above the other six theories.
This had led to deskilling, job fragmentation, and the transformation of work from the craft system to modern forms of labour control based upon techniques of scientific management and mechanisation.
We recommend that you start by briefly setting out the main aspects of the scientific management approach.
The introductory chapter provides a historical context for scientific management, examining the work of Frederick Taylor, Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, and W.
Amid such 20th century realities, scientific management typically led to policy gridlock.
These are also examined against the background of the development of scientific management, both in Italy and elsewhere.
His citation reads "for 30 years of continuous plasma physics contributions in high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion research and scientific management.
The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the commonalities between total quality and scientific management, and explain how Follett's law of situation bridges the gap between these seemingly different approaches.
The principle of scientific management systematized production, in the process radically changing the relationship between employer and employee.
T]he logic that motivated the early purveyors and adapters of scientific management has continued to dominate the course of automation in the 20th century workplace.
An Inter-Program Steering Committee (with membership from all the programs) will be appointed and will have scientific management oversight and responsibility for developing communication, coordination and collaboration among the Programs.
Principle 1: Approach Training Scientifically Drucker (1999) views Frederick Taylor's (1911) scientific management as one of the most important concepts of the modern world, with Taylor's ideas still being appropriate for manual operations and for knowledge work that involves manual operations.

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