scab

(redirected from scabby)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Scab

In organized labor, an employee who breaks a strike. That is, a scab does not go on strike with other employees but instead keeps working. A scab may do this out of concern for his/her livelihood, because he/she does not agree with the reasons for striking, or for some other reason. Because scabs are thought to reduce the effectiveness of a strike, the term is highly derogatory.

‘scab’

see BLACKLEG.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
But let's start with a small miracle in this corner of Earth by talking up the miracle of William the Scabby, the man who wouldn't die.
When the results were read out, a pair of wooden spoons were presented to the aptly named 'Don't Knows' and there was a late rally from the 'Scabby Mongrels' who managed to reduce our lead to just three, but it didn't stop Brian from adding to his burgeoning trophy cabinet.
Allowed to go unattended, the mites multiply rapidly, causing a brownish, scabby looking residue to build up inside the ear.
Backyard apple growers usually settle for less, consigning the scabby, wormy fruit to the compost pile or the cider press.
During this time, the blisters usually swell up, rupture, and then slowly ooze fluid that dries and forms an unsightly scabby crust before slowly disappearing.
330 that it couldn't use a 12-foot-tall inflatable "Scabby the Rat" figure in its picket against amasonry contractor that was paying wages and benefits the union deemed substandard.
If you've driven into or from Balfron you will have passed what at first glance appears to be a scabby oak tree, held together by iron bands.
"I bet they are delighted they have scored a scabby goal like that, but from our point of view, not good enough." Sheringham might only be two months into his managerial career, but Carlisle boss Keith Curle reckons he is still learning his trade too.
They are linked to a story contained in a Vatican Library manuscript about the hanging and mysterious revival in Swansea of William Cragh, also known as "Willliam the Scabby" in Swansea in 1290.
But matted fur and scabby skin can't make Francine any less adorable.
It's their mangled feet, pecked heads and scabby wings, their brazenness about flapping up onto your table at an outdoor cafe and eating your cake crumbs, while giving you dysentery or the black death or something, they're so riddled with disease.
He fought in the Burmese jungle and when he said he was so hungry he "could eat a scabby mule" he knew what he was talking about.