Serif

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Serif

In typography, a small mark attached to a letter. Serifs do not alter the meanings of letters. They are decorative and are not present in some fonts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both Gill Sans and Futura offer sans-serif designs that depart from the so-called grotesque model that had constituted sans-serif type for a century, but they headed in different directions as a closer examination shows.
46) This, of course, echoed Jan Tschichold's description of sans-serif types in Die Neue Typographic, which was a key document of modernism in typography.
In 1957, the Haas foundry produced Neue Haas Grotesk, a cleaned up version of nineteenth-century sans-serif faces like Akzidenz Grotesk.
Gill Sans was a modern sans-serif design that was distinct from the modernist typographic world, and the rhetoric against modernism suggested humanist as an apt name to record that distinction.
In sans-serif fonts the bar is placed in the middle between the bowl and the overall height of the ascender (for the lack of serifs).
The extension to the left is much more than 50%, around 67% in sans-serif fonts, and 78% in serif ones, mostly because of the bigger contrasts of letters.
1 Results Font x% h% H% d% Serif-regular 61 50 38 136 Sans-serif-regular 55 44 119 Serif-bold 78 51 37 123 Sans-serif bold 67 45 117
Designers Peter Bilak and Tarek Atrissi, who collaborated on an Arabic extension of the Fedra font family, concluded early on that serif and sans-serif styles held no place in the history or tradition of Arabic type.
Each line is a different display type more ridiculous than the last: Half are absurd decorative titles; a few are weird, geometric, condensed sans-serif faces; and the rest is hand-engraved script.
9 Optima Seeking to create a sans-serif modern-style typeface with the readability of serifed classic and humanist faces, designer Hermann Zapf devised the "implied serif.
White sans-serif type on white glossy field, the text of Larry Johnson's Untitled (The Thinking Man's Judy Garland) (all works 1999-2000)-- "the / thinking / man's / judy / garland"-- almost fades from sight altogether.
While the paintings are all titled simply Black & White (all 1993) their blocky sans-serif letter forms convey such simple but emotionally loaded words as LUST, HATE, LIE, HEAT, HOPE, AGE, and SHOT: words that seem elemental, somehow obvious in meaning, yet ones that easily lend themselves to rhetorical inflation or evasion, and have thus become strangely contingent.