Salmonella

(redirected from salmonellosis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to salmonellosis: salmonella, shigellosis

Salmonella

A genus of bacteria known to cause illness in humans and animals, especially after they have eaten infected food. Salmonella infections have been associated with chicken eggs, a fact that in the past has caused marketing and other business problems in the poultry industry in the United States. However, fatal poisonings are extremely rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
We reviewed the regulations as of December 2011 for childcare centers in all US states aimed at preventing reptile- and amphibian-associated salmonellosis (Table).
Few watermelon-associated salmonellosis outbreaks have been reported; this appears to be the largest.
Warmer temperatures may increase salmonellosis cases because warm days facilitate the growth of Salmonella in risky foods, such as eggs and meat, left at room temperature, and altered rainfall patterns can mean that water sources used for irrigation of produce or as drinking water may be contaminated (Liu et al.
Winn Feline Foundation reported on two cases of salmonellosis found in two cats from the same household.
Psittacines: salmonellosis and psittacosis; poultry and reptiles: salmonellosis; rabbits: dermatophytosis; nonhuman primates and zoological species: salmonellosis and mycobacteriosis.
For this analysis, deidentified reports of confirmed, probable, and suspected campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis ([dagger]) cases reported during 2014 in residents aged [greater than or equal to] 16 years were obtained from notifiable diseases surveillance systems in Maryland, Ohio, and Virginia.
The risk of acquiring a Salmonella infection from turtles has persisted and may be increasing, as suggested by a recent surge in the number of national salmonellosis outbreaks.
Salmonellosis is one of the important zoonosis covering diversified range of hosts.
Although the primary source of salmonella infection in humans is contaminated food, it has been estimated that 3-5 per cent of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets, including iguanas, turtles, sugar gliders and hedgehogs (Woodward, 1997).
In a recent study on extra intestinal salmonellosis in a tertiary care center in south India, sudhaharan et al showed that out of 36 patients diagnosed with extra intestinal salmonellosis the predominant serotype isolated was Salmonella typhi in 27(75%) patients.
The children who apparently picked up the salmonellosis from reptiles were much more likely to be sicker than children who got the disease some other way.
Not all the food animals which contract Salmonella develop salmonellosis rather such animals become carriers along with the recovered ones from the disease and such animals are constant source of zoonosis (Pao et al.