sales


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Sales

The revenue that a company derives from the sale of its products. This is distinguished from sources of revenue like interest income, investments, and others. A company records its sales on a balance sheet. Obviously, high sales are usually thought desirable, particularly when expenses are high.

sales

The revenue from the sale of goods and services. Sales exclude other types of revenue such as dividends, interest, and rent.
References in classic literature ?
This expression was peculiarly noticeable in him at the sale, and those who had only seen him in his moods of gentle oddity or of bright enjoyment would have been struck with a contrast.
Why, it's a bill of sale, signed by John Fosdick," said the man, "making over to you the girl Lucy and her child.
I entreat you to reflect, madame; for if you force the sale, you will lose a hundred thousand francs.
You see, he had slaved and exposed slaves for sale in British territory.
He had been what is known in some parts of the Union (which is admittedly a free country) as a "merchant"; that is to say, he kept a retail shop for the sale of such things as are commonly sold in shops of that character.
On the morrow he would make out the bill of sale and I could enter into possession.
Between eight o'clock and midnight one optician in Jones'-Fall Street made his fortune by the sale of opera-glasses.
Thus it happened to poor Tom; who was no sooner pardoned for selling the horse, than he was discovered to have some time before sold a fine Bible which Mr Allworthy gave him, the money arising from which sale he had disposed of in the same manner.
I got this box at old Dives's sale," Pincher says, handing it round, "one of Louis XV's mistresses-- pretty thing, is it not?
And the idea that he might be let on by his interests, that he might seek a reconciliation with his wife on account of the sale of the forest--that idea hurt him.
Separating these, the board and trestles became a counter, the basket supplied the few small lots of fruit and sweets that he offered for sale upon it and became a foot-warmer, the unfolded clothes-horse displayed a choice collection of halfpenny ballads and became a screen, and the stool planted within it became his post for the rest of the day.
Tulliver, still confident that he should gain his suit, and finding it eminently inconvenient to raise the said sum until that desirable issue had taken place, had rashly acceded to the demand that he should give a bill of sale on his household furniture and some other effects, as security in lieu of the bond.