rural

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Rural

Describing a town or vicinity outside a major, metropolitan area. Rural areas have low population density. Most people in rural areas work in urban or suburban areas, but some still work in agricultural or energy producing industries. In the United States, living in a rural area can qualify one for some forms of government assistance, such as a USDA mortgage.
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rural

Concerning the country. Contrast with urban or suburban.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pruitt, Rural Gentrification, LEGAL RURALISM BLOG (last visited May 1, 2014), http://legalruralism.blogspot.com/search/label/rural%20gentrification.
For an account of the importance of ruralism to the idea of Englishness during this period, see Martin J.
As we reflect on the camp experience, we observe an evolution illuminated by urbanism and ruralism, gender issues, socio-economic issues, socialization, values, character formation, reinforcement of groups skills, ethnic awareness, immigration, and religion ...
Concentrating on Marti's writing in the last chapters of Death of a Discipline, Spivak reveals how this nationalist struggling for Cuban independence moves from mere nationalism to internationalism and campaigns for a postcolonial internationality that favors a more heterogeneous version of "Latin America." In keeping with her subaltern theory, she asks, "Is it possible to make Marti's ruralism into a mochlos for planetarity," maintaining that the planetarity she is speaking about is "perhaps best imagined from the pre-capitalist cultures of the planet" (101).
Pruitt, Using Oldtimer-Newcomer Synergy to Solve Rural Problems, Legal Ruralism Blog, Sept.
Purdy's stories, then, represent a new offspring of regionalism: ruralism without region.
His voice is easily associated with a ruralism that seems to separate the middle states from those surrounding them.
The subject property's location also makes it a fitting candidate for the development movement known as New Ruralism, which fills the investors' needs of finding projects that will afford them low taxes, flexible building timelines, and wide array of site sizes.
It is really astonishing how, to a much greater extent than Sao Paulo, Rio conserves within its vibrant roguishness as an international city a sort of ruralism and a static traditional character.
Duffy attributes this growth to "new ruralism." Factors fueling this trend include technology that allows employees to work in remote locations, baby boomers retiring to the country, general population growth and a migration from urban to rural areas.
"The Effects of Ruralism, Bureaucratic Structure, and Economic Role on Right-Wing Extremism." Canadian Journal of Political Science, 12 (1): 155-165.
Notice that as Heaney is working here to call our attention to the skyward movement in Frost's earthy ruralism, his own employment of etymology turns in the other direction, paralleling Chappell's move from verse to versus.