run

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Run

A run consists of a series of bid and offer quotes for different securities or maturities. Dealers give and ask for runs from each other.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Run

An event in which many account holders at a bank withdraw all of their funds at the same time because they do not believe the bank is solvent. In the United States, runs were fairly common before the creation of the FDIC, which insures bank deposits up to a certain amount. See also: Panic.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

run

1. A dealer's list of security offerings with respective bid and ask quotes. Compare off-the-run issue.
2. A sequence of security price movements in the same direction. Five straight days in which a stock price closes higher is an example of a run. Runs have been evaluated in order to determine if the charting of stock is a worthwhile way to earn an above-average return.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

run

to start executing a specific PROGRAM on a COMPUTER.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
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