run

(redirected from run its course)
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Run

A run consists of a series of bid and offer quotes for different securities or maturities. Dealers give and ask for runs from each other.

Run

An event in which many account holders at a bank withdraw all of their funds at the same time because they do not believe the bank is solvent. In the United States, runs were fairly common before the creation of the FDIC, which insures bank deposits up to a certain amount. See also: Panic.

run

1. A dealer's list of security offerings with respective bid and ask quotes. Compare off-the-run issue.
2. A sequence of security price movements in the same direction. Five straight days in which a stock price closes higher is an example of a run. Runs have been evaluated in order to determine if the charting of stock is a worthwhile way to earn an above-average return.

run

to start executing a specific PROGRAM on a COMPUTER.
References in periodicals archive ?
By opting to allow the boom to run its course, Greenspan gave license to risk-taking entrepreneurs to drive U.S.
He said the market needed to "run its course." Litton explained that getting beef to the grocery store did not happen "over night." He explained that when a heifer is born, it would take her about 15 months to reach maturity.
"If left to run its course," says the CLMA/NFPA, "water quality, riparian areas, wildlife habitat and other environmental, visual and recreational qualities can be negatively impacted.
Because the village is one large, extended family, these visits can number a dozen before the evening has run its course.
We just let nature run its course; from school, to going to camp together, to livin' in the projects, and our mothers knowin' each other.
If Florida's manual recount had been permitted to run its course, the nation would have faced a constitutional crisis once seven Justices later concluded such counting had been unconstitutional.
That once-successful gambit, however, may have run its course. Chile's latest headline-making development project also goes by a popular single name: Cascade.
The spirit of the March 10 joint letter was to put into place a process for resolving issues related to loan-loss allowances going forward, and permit the agencies to work together in this process to resolve allowance matters and avoid significant changes in methodology that would encourage a decline in allowances before this process had run its course.
The second novel approach really grows out of the first, since it consists of stressing the magnitude of the Catholic recovery at the middle and end of the century, when the Protestant Reformation had run its course and become a movement bent on trying to defend what it had conquered, usually in futility.