run


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Run

A run consists of a series of bid and offer quotes for different securities or maturities. Dealers give and ask for runs from each other.

Run

An event in which many account holders at a bank withdraw all of their funds at the same time because they do not believe the bank is solvent. In the United States, runs were fairly common before the creation of the FDIC, which insures bank deposits up to a certain amount. See also: Panic.

run

1. A dealer's list of security offerings with respective bid and ask quotes. Compare off-the-run issue.
2. A sequence of security price movements in the same direction. Five straight days in which a stock price closes higher is an example of a run. Runs have been evaluated in order to determine if the charting of stock is a worthwhile way to earn an above-average return.

run

to start executing a specific PROGRAM on a COMPUTER.
References in classic literature ?
For if you would consider for a moment, you small boys, you would remember that the Cock, where the run ends and the good ale will be going, lies far out to the right on the Dunchurch road, so that every cast you take to the left is so much extra work.
But they have too little run left in themselves to pull up for their own brothers.
East, still doing the cicerone, pointed out all the remarkable characters to Tom as they passed: Osbert, who could throw a cricket-ball from the little-side ground over the rook-trees to the Doctor's wall; Gray, who had got the Balliol scholarship, and, what East evidently thought of much more importance, a half-holiday for the School by his success; Thorne, who had run ten miles in two minutes over the hour; Black, who had held his own against the cock of the town in the last row with the louts; and many more heroes, who then and there walked about and were worshipped, all trace of whom has long since vanished from the scene of their fame.
The only incident worth recording here, however, was his first run at hare-and-hounds.
"I think it's a great shame," said another small boy, "to have such a hard run for the last day."
"Oh, the Barby run, I hear," answered the other; "nine miles at least, and hard ground; no chance of getting in at the finish, unless you're a first-rate scud."
"I'll carry Button-Bright," he said, for he knew the little boy's legs were too short to run fast.
One of the queer missiles struck the shaggy man on his back and nearly knocked him over; but he was at the mouth of the cave now, so he set down Button-Bright and told the boy to run across the bridge to Dorothy.
'But aren't you going to run and help her?' Alice asked, very much surprised at his taking it so quietly.
'You shouldn't have run him through with your horn, you know.'
"Now," says the duke, "after to-night we can run in the daytime if we want to.
"Huck, does you reck'n we gwyne to run acrost any mo' kings on dis trip?"