Russian Ruble

(redirected from ruble)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Russian Ruble

The currency of Russia. It was issued in 1998, replacing the Soviet ruble (which was also called the Russian ruble after the fall of the Soviet Union). Despite the issue of a new currency, it lost 70% of its value against the U.S. dollar in six weeks as a result of the Russian financial crisis. It is a floating currency.
References in periodicals archive ?
6 billion rubles well more than in November 2016 by 56% and 70% respectively.
com/news/articles/2016-01-19/tripwire-for-bank-of-russia-seen-closer-as-oil-slump-sinks-ruble) A majority of analysts polled by news agency Bloomberg Wednesday said if the ruble reaches 90 against the dollar the bank will begin its first foreign-currency sales in over a year.
The ruble sank Monday to its lowest point this year as Asian and European stock markets nosedived on concerns over the Chinese economy.
Stabilizing the ruble, which is one of the world's worst-performing currencies this year following the slide in oil prices and the sanctions imposed on Russia, is a priority for the country's monetary authorities.
Brent has another $10-$15 downside risk but I doubt if the ruble falls below 34 to the dollar even in a oil crash scenario.
The transfer from dollar to ruble is due to occur on the night of 31 December 2005/1 January 2006 whereby all prices for the tariffs will be transferred into Russian rubles.
Ruble elucidates these resemblances in introductory accounts of each city's overall history, not only up through the period on which he concentrates but also into the years after the First World War.
Assuming he was about to be robbed, the guard ran to a vault room in the store and called for deputies, Ruble said.
Section II provides a short history of the dissolution of the ruble area.
Moscow resorted to the step because its foreign exchange reserves have fallen too low to continue currency market intervention to prop up the ruble.
It sought to create a ruble business that would be locally sourced, supplied, and staffed.
While growing privatization and monetizing the economy (including making the ruble convertible with the dollar and other foreign currencies) will continue to produce shockwaves affecting the economy, Potvin is optimistic about the future--particularly because of the changing attitudes he has observed.