royalties


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Royalty

A fee that one receives in exchange for allowing another party to use and profit from one's property. For example, a publisher who prints and sells a book must compensate the author for use of his/her intellectual property. Usually a royalty is a percentage of the revenue or profit that the other party (in this example, the publisher) makes.

royalties

payments made for the use of an INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT (copyrights, patents etc.) or physical property rights (mineral extraction rights etc.).
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to collecting your performance royalties, ASCAP, BMI and SESAC all offer regular songwriters' panels and showcases to help their members develop their careers.
Citing Plastics Engineering, the IRS ruled that the royalties paid by the subsidiary for the rights under the licensing agreement constituted licensing and franchise costs within the scope of Regs.
MLB Properties' new program does not replace the museum's program, which has generated over $6 million in sales for various licenses, with royalties going to the museum.
In considering what might constitute a "reasonable" royalty, it is recommended that subcommittee members might want to first examine the practices in the industry when private royalties are negotiated.
Royalties. Article 12 of the 1981 Draft provides that royalties derived and beneficially owned by a resident of the Contracting State shall be taxable only in that State.
In February Sandstorm Gold said it had entered into an arrangement agreement with Gold Royalties.
International Royalty Corporation (AMEX:ROY) (TSX: IRC), a US-based mineral royalty company, has completed acquisitions of certain Australian royalties from Rio Tinto (LSE: RIO) (ASX: RIO) (NYSE:RTP).
In general, this new provision provides an exception from the subpart F rules for dividends, interest, rents and royalties received from related CFCs, if the income that gives rise to the repatriated earnings does not originate from subpart F income when earned by the CFC.
In fiscal year 2001, the federal government collected $7.5 billion in royalties from the sale of oil and gas produced on federal lands.
The taxpayer argued that deductions "which are attributable to" property held for the production of rents or royalties are allowed by IRC section 161 in arriving at adjusted gross income.