RAM

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RAM

Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

RAM (Random Access Memory)

a COMPUTER memory device from which data can be read and on to which data can be written. The contents of such memory can be added to, or erased, by an operator. RAM is incorporated in microchips which allow the operative access to any part of the memory without having to move sequentially through the contents of the memory from start to finish.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

RAM

Short for reverse annuity mortgage. See reverse mortgage.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
From Table 3, in contrast to the symmetric airfoil, the rostrum does experience a small amount of lift ([C.sub.l] = 0.024) at [alpha] = 0[degrees].
Rostrum.--Rostra were measured according to the methods of Fierstine and Voigt (1996).
Both autism groups had significantly smaller measurements for the total corpus callosum and the rostrum and genu; the oldest group also had reduced measurements in the splenium.
The current identification keys show that, for shrimps [greater than or equal to] 8 mm CL, the pink spotted shrimp has a proportionately longer rostrum than the southern pink shrimp.
Alderton grabbed himself an early 18th birthday present when he reached the rostrum on the penultimate day, thanks to a new personal best of 15min 27.15sec
Walker's main target is to grab more places on the rostrum which both he and GSE team-mate, James Toseland, achieved in Spain.
A microphone on the rostrum is a groan-making sight at any concert - this was no exception.
The British challenge has yet again more resembled an audition for Wacky Races than a serious assault on the rostrum.
In the evening, with the terrific conductor Andrea Quinn on the rostrum, the music glittered, raced, and shouted (see "Music, Maestra," Dance Magazine, July, page 40).
The 37-year-old from Carmoney came off his Aprilia at Donington Park's Coppice Corner while fighting for a rostrum finish in the British GP.
Where speakers have traditionally used their time on the rostrum to boast about brilliant discoveries, preternaturally accurate prophesies, or ingenious strategies, they now talk about missed opportunities, lack of foresight, errors in judgment, overconfidence, immaturity, remorse, and despair.
Before daybreak on July 12, Jim Foster of San Francisco's Society for Individual Rights and Madeline Davis of Buffalo, N.Y.'s Mattachine Society stood at the rostrum and, as The Advocate reported, "spoke seriously for nearly half an hour about gay rights."