ROE

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ROE

Return on Equity

A publicly-traded company's earnings divided by the amount of money invested in stock, expressed as a percentage. This is a measure of how well the company is investing the money invested in it. A high return on equity indicates that the company is spending wisely and is likely profitable; a low return on equity indicates the opposite. As a result, high returns on equity lead to higher stock prices. Some analysts believe that return on equity is the single most important indicator of publicly-traded companies' health. See also: Growth stock.

ROE

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To get more information on ROE Web, you can visit the HRSDC web site at: http://www.
Norm king is project officer, ROE Web, for Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.
Second, when measuring ROE, a distinction should be made between current ROE and forecasted ROE.
The authors examined the ROE as reported on four popular financial websites--Yahoo, Morningstar, Bloomberg, and SmartMoney--for the 30 companies in the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA).
To determine the source of the differences in computed ROE, the authors obtained the three most recent annual and four most recent quarterly financial statements for several of the companies.
The variation in ROE thus must have resulted from the use of different computation techniques by each website (see the Sidebar on page 70).
6 percent ROE last year, mainly as a result of a $31 million decline in income from continuing operations due to the sale of A&B's Matson Container Leasing Inc.
7 OCEANA: EXPORT SUPPLIES OF FRESH OR CHILLED FISH LIVERS AND ROES
8 THE MIDDLE EAST: EXPORT SUPPLIES OF FRESH OR CHILLED FISH LIVERS AND ROES
Lower ROEs can erode the financial cushion needed for unexpected events, rising costs or lower sales volumes and over time could lead to a rise in the cost of fixed-income investors perceive greater risk and demand a higher credit spread on new financings or refinancing.