Right-to-Work

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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tony Evers' biggest proposals in the first vote taken this year by the state's budget-writing committee, including plans to set aside $40 million to replace lead pipes, repeal the state's right-to-work laws and reinstate prevailing-wage laws.
This problem of regional union membership concentration is further exacerbated by the fact that 26 American states now have so-called Right-to-Work laws that prevent mandatory dues payment.
According to the (http://www.nrtw.org/right-to-work-frequently-asked-questions/) National Right to Work Legal Foundation , the principle of the initiative "affirms the right of every American to work for a living without being compelled to belong to a union." But the issue at stake with right-to-work laws is not about whether workers are coerced to join unions - in the United States, no employee can be forced to sign up - but union payments.
The Republican majority leader spearheaded passage of the right-to-work law, arguing it would help the state's struggling economy by creating jobs, boosting manufacturing and improving the state's business climate.
Fisk and Sachs propose another possible solution to the inequity of the "right-to-work laws": abandonment of the principle of exclusivity and the duty of fair representation in "right-to-work" states for those who opt out of all fees.
In an update of a question asked in 1957, 71% of Americans said they would "vote for" a right-to-work law if they had the opportunity to do so, while 22% said they would vote against such a law.
IN DECEMBER OF LAST YEAR, the American state of Michigan--the birthplace of the UAW and the sit-down strikes of the 1930s that ushered in industrial unionism in North America--became the 24th state to pass a right-to-work law. It eliminates the required payment of union dues for all workers in a given bargaining unit in that state.
Some experts see Michigan's right-to-work law as a blow to the state's Democratic Party, as unions have historically been a major source of support for liberals.
5) True or False: The 7th Circuit upheld the constitutionality of Wisconsin's controversial right-to-work law, the same law that led to the attempted recall of Governor Scott Walker.
In a 58-41 vote by the Republican-dominated House to approve a Senate version of the law, Michigan became the 24th state to take a strike against organized labor with the right-to-work law.
(51) Twenty-two states have exercised this power, and their resulting statutes comprise what is colloquially known as the "right-to-work." (52) Although states differ in the extent to which they utilize 14(b) to restrict security agreements, in general, a right-to-work law "forbid[s] unions and employers from conditioning employment on any form of union 'membership,' even if a majority of employees in the bargaining unit have selected the union as their exclusive bargaining representative." (53) In so doing, state right-to-work laws--either explicitly or as interpreted judicially--bar most union security agreements, including agency fee arrangements, (54) which obligate nonmembers to pay the equivalent of union dues and fees for the union's services.
"An anti-union group is raising money in Montana to convince the 2007 Legislature to pass a right-to-work law, but organized labor has vowed to fight the effort again.