Right-to-Work

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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Right-to-work laws allow workers to opt out of paying those dues.
Although more Americans approve than disapprove of unions, they also widely support right-to-work laws.
The Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario led by Tim Hudak, a former colleague of Mike Harris, has openly called for right-to-work laws in Ontario.
These so-called right-to-work laws, they don't have anything to do with economics, they have everything to do with politics," the president told a crowd of workers at an engine plant in Redford, Mich.
In Nevada, the seventh, the state Supreme Court has held that the state's right-to-work law does not prohibit a union from charging nonmembers a fee in exchange for grievance representation.
Simply put, right-to-work laws weaken unions and collective bargaining and deny majority rule.
One of the central is sues in that debate is the role of right-to-work laws.
The only thing Right-to-Work laws give you is the right to work for less money.
Every morning, I open up the paper and say, This is another part of the Pepper Schwartz right-to-work law,'' said Schwartz, the sociologist.
or Maryland) has a right-to-work law, and for the Kansas City SMSA, since Kansas (but not Missouri) has a right-to-work law.
The key explanatory variable is RTW, which indicates whether or not an TABULAR DATA OMITTED individual's state of residence has a right-to-work law.
The study by Professor Marty Wolfson, Director of the Higgins Program and former Federal Reserve Board economist, shows that states that have passed a right-to-work law have not seen any meaningful increase in the growth of income in their states.