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Triangle

In technical analysis, a series of high and low prices for a security that, when plotted on a chart, looks vaguely like a triangle. A triangle indicates that investors do not know whether a bull market or a bear market will prevail. If the triangle breaks upward, it is a bullish sign, but if it breaks downward, it is a bearish sign. A triangle is also called a wedge. See also: Ascending sign, Descending sign.

triangle

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triangle
In technical analysis, a chart pattern indicating the convergence in the movement of successive high and low prices and characterized by a formation that resembles a triangle turned on its side. A triangle indicates a period of combat between bulls and bears with the technical analyst having to determine the winner. If prices break out of the triangle on the upside, it is a bullish sign. A breakout on the downside indicates the bears are winners. The closer the breakout occurs to the point of the triangle, the less conclusive the signal to buy or sell. Also called coil, flag, pennant, wedge. See also ascending triangle, descending triangle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem, which was first posed more than a thousand years ago, concerns the areas of right-angled triangles.
GF and GE are medians to the hypotenuse in right-angled triangles, which are equal to half the hypotenuse, and therefore:
A 'why' approach to teaching this topic emphasises that the distance between two points can be found by looking at the right-angled triangle formed by the difference in x and y coordinates (see Figure 2).
If one of the angles is exactly 90[degrees], we have a right-angled triangle.
Since EKF is a right-angled triangle and KF is tiny compared to the other two sides, we once again postulate that hypotenuse EF can be taken to be equal to side EK, using the same logic and mathematics as above for the square.
It is: the square of the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides.
Figure 1 shows the typical visual of moving the shaded right-angled triangle piece from one side of the parallelogram to the other to show that the parallelogram can be recomposed into a rectangle.
In any right-angled triangle, the square on the hypotenuse equals the sum of the squares on the other two sides.
Suppose integers a and b are the shorter sides of a right-angled triangle.
The hypotenuse is the longest side of a right-angled triangle, so we know from triangle DEC that DC > DE and from triangle DEF that DE > DF.
If we consider a right-angled triangle formed by the human gnomon and the distance d m from the centre of the sundial at which the person stands, the hypotenuse of this triangle makes an angle of 37.
A Pythagorean triple is a set of three integers which occur as the side lengths of a right-angled triangle.