revolver


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Line of Credit

An agreement between a bank and a company or an individual to provide a certain amount in loans on demand from the borrower. The borrower is under no obligation to actually take out a loan at any particular time, but may take part of the funds at any time over a period of several years. This agreement is fairly common in situations in which a business must make payroll but does not always have the operating income to do so, especially when its operating income is seasonal or otherwise varies from month to month. It is also called open-end credit or a revolving line of credit. See also: Credit Card.

revolver

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References in classic literature ?
I threatened them with the revolver, but they sat stolidly in the flooded cabin and on the roof and would not move.
This left me one hand for the sheet and one for the revolver. The dark line drew nearer, and I could see them looking from me to it and back again with an apprehension they could not successfully conceal.
Very shortly he returned with an extra revolver and ammunition belt strapped about his waist.
Then he led her a little farther into the forest, halted beneath a large tree with spreading branches, buckled a cartridge belt and revolver about her waist, and assisted her to clamber into the lower branches.
Quickly she slipped a cartridge into each of the chambers of the revolver. Then she backed toward the end of the tent, keeping the entrance covered by her weapon.
Her hand went out over the revolver toward his hand, as she pointed to the tell-tale yellow stain on his fingers.
Clayton, unseen by any, picked up the fallen revolver and slipped it inside his shirt, then he joined the sailors in gazing, mystified, into the jungle.
Dounia lowered the revolver and looked at Svidrigailov not so much in terror as in a sort of wild amazement.
It was fairly simple, given the directing power that was his, to introduce a spark into the powder-magazines of a fort, a battleship, or a revolver. And not alone could he thus explode powder at a distance, but he could ignite conflagrations.
Another Sagoth fell to the bullet from the revolver; but it did not stop his companions.
Instantly the fellow sprang to his feet with a cry and levelled his revolver at the intruder.
As he was going out, he met Passepartout, who asked him if it would not be well, before taking the train, to purchase some dozens of Enfield rifles and Colt's revolvers. He had been listening to stories of attacks upon the trains by the Sioux and Pawnees.