Retracement

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Retracement

A price movement in the opposite direction of the previous trend.

Retracement

A situation in which a price begins to move back toward its former price after it has changed significantly in a brief period of time. An example of retracement occurs when a stock falls 10% but then recovers 8%.
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7100 to retrace the sell-off from August 2008 but nevertheless, as equity futures foreshadow a lower open for the Asian stock markets, a rise in risk appetite could led the pair to retrace the advance from the previous week.
Collin's strength is that she does not merely retrace well-traveled roads but addresses issues that have not been fully explored.
The secrets of the Holy Grail will be revealed as travelers retrace the footsteps of protagonist Robert Langdon with Air France Holidays' The Mysteries of Da Vinci package; available through October 31, 2006.
00 may push the dollar-yen higher over the remainder of the trade, and we may see the pair may retrace the sharp decline over the following week to test for near-term resistance.
Two of the Sackett brothers attempt to retrace their father's final journey to the West as a guide for a French family apparently looking for a large stash of hidden gold.
The second exhibition will retrace globalization to the, present as a romantic overvaluation of the local, displaying an irreparable traumatic Western memory.
When the pressure is lifted, the atoms simply retrace their paths to their original locations.
0% Fib) may lead the pair to retrace the four-day rally, and we may see the pair continue to hold a broad range over the near-term as investors weigh the outlook for future policy.
In "Reservation Rocks" and "Onate's Foot," Nasdijj, his dog, and an historian friend retrace a 400-year-old march designed by the Spanish to kill a nation.
And when one turned to retrace this path "paved with books," it became dear that the floor of the gallery had been raised at an angle to create the illusion of a much deeper space.
Conventional wisdowm, Werbos says, holds that information flows forward from cell to cell in the mammalian brain, but does not retrace its steps in the back propagation manner.